crystal

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crystal

 [kris´t'l]
a homogeneous angular solid of definite form, with systematically arranged elemental units.
hydroxyapatite crystal microscopic crystals of hydroxyapatite occurring in joints or bursae in a variety of connective tissue disorders.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl),
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]

crystal

/crys·tal/ (kris´t'l) a homogeneous angular solid of definite form, with systematically arranged elemental units.
blood crystals  hematoidin crystals in the blood.
Charcot-Leyden crystals  elongated, diamond-shaped, birefringent crystals derived from disintegrating eosinophils, seen in serous fluids such as the bronchial secretions in asthma and in stools in some cases of intestinal parasitism.

crystal

[kris′təl]
Etymology: Gk, krystallos
a solid substance, either organic or inorganic, the atoms or molecules of which are arranged in a regular, repeating three-dimensional pattern, which determines the shape of a crystal. crystalline, adj.

crystal

Drug slang A popular term for a crystallized form of methamphetamine; PCP; amphetamine; cocaine Urology Kidney stone, see there Vox populi A formed structure, often composed of a single type of material, which has a characteristic appearance by LM. See Birefringent crystal, Calcium oxalate crystal, Charcot-Leyden crystal, Coffin lid crystal, Hemoglobin C crystal, Jackstraw crystal, Lead crystal, Parking lot crystal, Piezoelectric crystal, Reinke crystal, Rhomboid crystal, Space crystal, Uric acid crystal, Washington monument crystal.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for any given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another; can be seen in body fluids.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]

crystal,

n distinctive form of molecule created when an element or chemical compound is frozen or slowly solidified. Each element or compound has a unique structure often used in gem healing and in amulets of pendulum.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]

crystal(s),

n a naturally produced solid. The ultimate units of the substance from which it was formed are arranged systematically.

crystal

a naturally produced angular solid of definite form.

crystal-associated hepatopathy
crystal-induced arthritis
piezoelectric crystal
the source of sound waves in ultrasonography.
radiographic c's
crystals on radiographs caused by faulty use of fixative, commonly excess acidity or insufficient washing of the film.
synovial crystal
tissue crystal
recognizable crystals in tissues occur in crystal-associated cholangiohepatopathy, zinc and oxalate poisoning.
urines c's
crystal violet
a brilliant organic deep purple dye.
crystal violet vaccine
an obsolete hog cholera (classical swine fever) vaccine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fragile, too tiny to be easily manipulated, and likely to melt because of the warmth in an observer's breath, ice crystals make less-than-ideal experimental subjects.
14) When released, CLC protein aggregates to form distinctive crystals.
Goff inserted the proteins into a batch of ice cream in his lab, and the proteins had the same ice-modifying effect: Tiny crystals stayed tiny, even when he let the ice cream melt a little before refreezing.
Charles Saylor (1931-1968) Chemical microscopy relating to the formation of crystalline phases, crystalline rubber, optical properties of crystals.
Touchstone Crystal invites motivated and energetic self-starters who are excited to become part pioneers of a brand new business endeavor, and therefore, reap the benefits of being one of the first Touchstone Crystal independent sales consultants in the field.
This provides "one more level of complexity and one more level of scale" than crystals typically have, O'Keeffe says.
Crystals became defined as periodic arrangements of identical unit cells.
Frazier stumbled on painting with crystals two decades ago while working on a documentary about the birth of the universe.
Since it succeeded in industrially manufacturing synthetic quartz crystals in 1958, NDK has been mass-producing quartz crystals of uniform high quality utilizing its own technology.
However, to make wafers for electrical uses, technologists must create crystals at least several centimeters in diameter.
The theory of atomic scale order in crystals had long been established based on morphological and optical studies.
Headline of release dated November 13, 2006, should read: SiTime and Micro Crystal, a Company of The Swatch Group Enter Joint Development Agreement (sted SiTime and Micro Crystal/Swatch Enter Joint Development Agreement).