crystal

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crystal

 [kris´t'l]
a homogeneous angular solid of definite form, with systematically arranged elemental units.
hydroxyapatite crystal microscopic crystals of hydroxyapatite occurring in joints or bursae in a variety of connective tissue disorders.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl),
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]

crystal

/crys·tal/ (kris´t'l) a homogeneous angular solid of definite form, with systematically arranged elemental units.
blood crystals  hematoidin crystals in the blood.
Charcot-Leyden crystals  elongated, diamond-shaped, birefringent crystals derived from disintegrating eosinophils, seen in serous fluids such as the bronchial secretions in asthma and in stools in some cases of intestinal parasitism.

crystal

[kris′təl]
Etymology: Gk, krystallos
a solid substance, either organic or inorganic, the atoms or molecules of which are arranged in a regular, repeating three-dimensional pattern, which determines the shape of a crystal. crystalline, adj.

crystal

Drug slang A popular term for a crystallized form of methamphetamine; PCP; amphetamine; cocaine Urology Kidney stone, see there Vox populi A formed structure, often composed of a single type of material, which has a characteristic appearance by LM. See Birefringent crystal, Calcium oxalate crystal, Charcot-Leyden crystal, Coffin lid crystal, Hemoglobin C crystal, Jackstraw crystal, Lead crystal, Parking lot crystal, Piezoelectric crystal, Reinke crystal, Rhomboid crystal, Space crystal, Uric acid crystal, Washington monument crystal.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for any given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another; can be seen in body fluids.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]

crystal,

n distinctive form of molecule created when an element or chemical compound is frozen or slowly solidified. Each element or compound has a unique structure often used in gem healing and in amulets of pendulum.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]

crystal(s),

n a naturally produced solid. The ultimate units of the substance from which it was formed are arranged systematically.

crystal

a naturally produced angular solid of definite form.

crystal-associated hepatopathy
crystal-induced arthritis
piezoelectric crystal
the source of sound waves in ultrasonography.
radiographic c's
crystals on radiographs caused by faulty use of fixative, commonly excess acidity or insufficient washing of the film.
synovial crystal
tissue crystal
recognizable crystals in tissues occur in crystal-associated cholangiohepatopathy, zinc and oxalate poisoning.
urines c's
crystal violet
a brilliant organic deep purple dye.
crystal violet vaccine
an obsolete hog cholera (classical swine fever) vaccine.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the hypothesis that the water in the alluvial aquifer results from a combined process of dissolution/precipitation of salts and mixture between water that infiltrates the alluvial aquifer, from the releases of the Riacho Verde reservoir, and the water that is discharged by the crevices of crystalline rocks near the alluvial aquifer, the contribution of the crystalline basement was quantified considering that the concentrations of [Cl.
Variable lithological types of crystalline rocks were collected from altitude of ca.
1996): Porosity and pathway determination in crystalline rock by positron emission tomography and neutron radiography.
This model hypothesizes that extensive sheets of crystalline rock, generally 6 to 15 kilometers thick, have been thrust to the west over the sedimentary rocks of the continental margin.
1995): Matrix retardation studies: size and structure of the accessible pore space in fresh and altered crystalline rock.
In crystalline rocks below this depth, the weight of overlying rock should close off all cracks and pores, according to traditional thinking.
This is an important first step to increasing our scientific understanding of the potential uses for crystalline rock formations, said Secretary Moniz, including the feasibility of boreholes as an option for long term nuclear waste disposal.
It's not about the location, but the similar conditions of crystalline rock, which exists in much of the United States and much of the world," Harju said.
The in-situ permeability of deep-seated crystalline rocks of the continental crust and the infiltration degree of various fluids through these rocks are of great theoretical and practical importance.
These sites, all in granite or crystalline rock formations, are in Georgia, Maine, Minnesota, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Virginia and Wisconsin.
If nearby earthquakes occur, the crystalline rock could slip and allow for water and radioactive material to migrate away from the site, said Stephen Hickman, director of the U.
The project focuses on shaft seals for salt rock (German repository concept), tunnel plugs for clay rock (French and Swiss repository concepts), and tunnel plugs for crystalline rock (Czech, Finnish and Swedish repository concepts).