crystal

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Related to Crystaline: Crystalline structure

crystal

 [kris´t'l]
a homogeneous angular solid of definite form, with systematically arranged elemental units.
hydroxyapatite crystal microscopic crystals of hydroxyapatite occurring in joints or bursae in a variety of connective tissue disorders.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl),
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

crystal

Drug slang A popular term for a crystallized form of methamphetamine; PCP; amphetamine; cocaine Urology Kidney stone, see there Vox populi A formed structure, often composed of a single type of material, which has a characteristic appearance by LM. See Birefringent crystal, Calcium oxalate crystal, Charcot-Leyden crystal, Coffin lid crystal, Hemoglobin C crystal, Jackstraw crystal, Lead crystal, Parking lot crystal, Piezoelectric crystal, Reinke crystal, Rhomboid crystal, Space crystal, Uric acid crystal, Washington monument crystal.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for any given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another; can be seen in body fluids.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

crys·tal

(kris'tăl)
A solid of regular shape and, for a given compound, characteristic angles, formed when an element or compound solidifies slowly enough, as a result either of freezing from the liquid form or of precipitating out of solution, to allow the individual molecules to take up regular positions with respect to one another.
[G. krystallos, clear ice, crystal]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Scent with style sums up Bulgari's Omnia Crystaline Fragrance.
that our country is lavishly endowed with crystaline rivers and lakes.
Among those tenants are DMAS Realty Corp, signing a lease for 2,779 SF, Express Travel Services for 1,426 SF, Crystaline Cosmetics USA INC, for 1,217 SF, Business Instruments Corp./ Metro Escrime Corp.
Nanotubes made of crystaline titanium dioxide (titania) are 1500 times better than the next best material for sensing hydrogen, and may be one of the first examples of materials properties changing dramatically when crossing the border between real world sizes and nanoscopic dimensions, according to a Penn State materials scientist.
In the past three years--from 2001 to February 2003--BKPM has issued licenses to only two projects proposed by PT Crystaline Indonesia and PT Mitra Horkew Tirtasarana.
Although Catherine Naglestad projected the enchantress with absolute authority, Alice Coote stole the show as Ruggiero, with a tone both opulent and crystaline. Canadian-trained Carolina Smith made a strong impression as Morgana, while Roy Goodman, who is principal conductor of the Manitoba Chamber Orchestra, brilliantly led a perfectly integrated cohort of period and modern instruments through flexible and varied p aces.
Those are encircled by the firmament (fixed stars), then by the Crystaline, or Aqueous Sky.
In the sestet (like "Ne'er saw I, never felt, a calm so deep!"), the delayed emergence of the lyric "I" coincides with the realization of potency and renewal: "For me, who under kindlier laws belong / to Nature's tuneful quire, this rustling dry I Through leaves yet green, and yon crystaline sky, / Announce a season potent to renew." Nature is here transposed into the arena of thought ("Nature's tuneful quire") and the persona can look upon the seasonal death of nature as the mi nd's own inevitable and continual death.
Due to its isodimensional crystaline structure, gibbsite has been considered a crucial factor in assembling microparticles by acting as nuclei (Varajao 1988; Varajao et al.
Linda also looks for crystaline deposits beneath the skin which indicate a toxin build up.