cryptogam

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Related to Cryptogams: Cryptograms, phanerogams

cryptogam

(in obsolete classification schemes) any plant that does not produce seeds, i.e. plants placed in the groups Thallophyta, Bryophyta and Pteridophyta. Whereas in conifers and flowering plants (Phanerogamia) the organs of reproduction are prominent, they are not so in the Cryptogamia - hence the name (‘secret marriage’).
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally, expectations are that, at equilibrium, the ratio of the erosion rates for cryptogam covered and completely bare soil surfaces ([C.sub.r]) should be given by the equation:
The crux of Celakovsky's arguments with respect to land plants was that the asexual generations of mosses and vascular cryptogams were of the same nature as generation C, and were therefore antithetic to the sexual generation.
On the comparative morphology of the leaf in the vascular cryptogams and gymnosperms.
In vascular cryptogams (psilophytes, lycopods, sphenophytes, ferns), the sporophyte, though usually becoming independent, nonetheless has early stages that are heavily dependent on the gametophyte.
Studies on Colombian cryptogams, X: The genus Everniastrum, Hale and related taxa (Lichenes).
Overall, tropical lichens are one of the least studied cryptogams. For example, in Sri Lanka, new species and new records of lichens are being discovered at a rapid rate and in the coming years the number of tropical lichens recorded will contribute to new knowledge of their pharmaceutical potential [12, 13].
In the wettest areas an understory possibly composed of vascular cryptogams was also important; meanwhile, the probably most arid or saline coastal vegetation would be Araucariaceae and Cheirolepidiaceae forests (Peyrot et al., 2008).
In the laboratory the cryptogams were soaked overnight in water and inspected for tardigrades with a dissecting microscope (Nikon SMZ-U Zoom 1:10).
20.6, Hymenoptera spp., insect fragments, eggs and larvae 17.7, fungi, graminoids and cryptogams 6.3, forbs 8.4, large mammals 19.3, small mammals 18.8, birds 18.8, and unspecified meat 19.3 (Mealey 1980, Harting 1987, Pritchard and Robbins 1990, Dahle et al.
A comparison between the secondary xylems of vascular cryptogams, gymnosperms, and angiosperms.