cryoglobulinemia

(redirected from Cryoglobulinaemia)

cryoglobulinemia

 [kri″o-glob″u-lin-e´me-ah]
the presence of cryoglobulin in the blood, associated with a variety of clinical manifestations including Raynaud's phenomenon, vascular purpura, cold urticaria, necrosis of extremities, bleeding disorders, vasculitis, arthralgia, neurologic manifestations, hepatosplenomegaly, and glomerulonephritis.

cry·o·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(krī'ō-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă),
The presence of abnormal quantities of cryoglobulin in the blood plasma.

cryoglobulinemia

Primary cryoglobulinemia Hematology A condition caused by proteins that precipitate in vivo on cooling of acral parts, which are often associated with immune complex-related disease; cryoglobulinemia has been divided into 3 clinical forms Clinical Pain, cyanosis, arthralgias, vascular purpuras, cold intolerance, HTN, CHF Lab ↓ C4 and other complement proteins
Cryoglobulinemia
Type I Monoclonal cryoglobulinemia Underlying disease is often malignant; IgG (malignant myeloma), IgM macroglobulinemia or lymphoma/CLL, rarely others (eg IgA nephropathy), benign monoclonal gammopathy
Type II Poly-monoclonal cryoglobulinemia A complex of immunoglobulins, eg mixed IgM-IgG, G-G, A-G or other combinations that may be associated with lymphoreticular disease or connective tissue disease (rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, mixed essential cryoglobulinemia)
Type III Mixed polyclonal-polyclonal cryoglobulinemia Mixed IgG & IgM, ± IgA, due to rheumatoid arthritis, SLE, Sjögren syndrome, EBV, CMV, subacute bacterial infections, poststreptococcal, crescentic and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritides, DM, chronic hepatitis, biliary cirrhosis

cry·o·glob·u·lin·e·mi·a

(krī'ō-glob'yū-li-nē'mē-ă)
The presence of abnormal quantities of cryoglobulin in blood plasma.
Synonym(s): cryoglobulinaemia.

Cryoglobulinemia

Condition in which protein in the blood forms particles in the cold, blocking blood vessels and leading to pain and numbness of the extremities.
References in periodicals archive ?
There may also be membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, minimal change disease, membranous glomerulopathy, amyloidosis, acute immune-complex glomerulonephritis, cryoglobulinaemia, and IgA nephropathy on renal biopsy suggestive of HIVAN.
Piluso et al., "Assessment of free light chains in HCV-positive patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia vasculitis undergoing rituximab treatment," Liver International, vol.
Erythema elevatum diutinum, cryoglobulinaemia, and fixed urticaria on cooling.
(1.) Apartis E, Leger JM, Musset L, Gugenheim M, Cacoub P Lyon-Caen O, Pierrot-Deseilligny C, Hauw JJ, Bouche P Peripheral neuropathy associated with essential mixed cryoglobulinaemia: a role for hepatitis C virus infection?
Gross, "Mixed cryoglobulinaemia, glomerulonephritis, and ANCA: essential cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis or ANCA-associated vasculitis?" Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, vol.
Surrogate markers of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in patients with hepatitis C virus-related cryoglobulinaemia vasculitis.
Cacoub, "Hepatitis C-associated mixed cryoglobulinaemia: a crossroad between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation," Rheumatology, vol.
Table 1 Differential diagnosis of digital ischaemia post-cardiac surgery Aetiology Pathology and clinical examples Vessel wall Atherosclerosis Vasculitis: drug induced, cryoglobulinaemia, Takayasu's arteritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Reynaud's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, mixed connective tissue disease Embolism Cardiac source Proximal arterial aneurysm Thrombosis Atherosclerosis Arterial reconstruction Arterial catheter injury Arterial dissection Antiphospholipid syndrome Thrombosic thrombocytopenia purpura HITTS Disseminated intravascular coagulation Trauma/physical Drugs, e.g.
In hepatitis C cryoglobulinaemia (an example of an infectious cause of IC disease) it is important to block B cells but also to remove antigen by treating the infection.
EAC has been associated with many different entities, including infections, food allergy and drug reactions, polycythemia vera, cryoglobulinaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, hypereosinophilic syndrome, hyperthyroidism, autoimmune thyroidities, hepatic diseases, pregnancy and malignant neoplasms (2).