crust

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crust

 [krust]
a formed outer layer, especially an outer layer of solid matter formed by drying of a bodily exudate or secretion.
milk crust cradle cap.

crust

(krŭst),
1. A hard outer layer or covering; cutaneous crusts are often formed by dried serum or pus on the surface of a ruptured blister or pustule.
2. A scab.
Synonym(s): crusta
[L. crusta]

crust

(krust) a formed outer layer, especially of solid matter formed by drying of a bodily exudate or secretion.
milk crust  crusta lactea.

crust

(krŭst)
n.
An outer layer or coating formed by the drying of a bodily exudate such as pus or blood; a scab.
v. crusted, crusting, crusts
v.intr.
1. To become covered with a crust.
2. To harden into a crust.

crust′less adj.

crust

Etymology: L, crusta, shell
a solidified, hard outer layer formed by the drying of a body exudate, such as blood or pus, common in dermatological conditions such as eczema, impetigo, seborrhea, and favus and during the healing of burns and lesions; a scab. Also called crusta.
enlarge picture
Crust
Cosmetic surgery A patch of dried protein-rich material that oozes from a hair graft, which sloughs off in 1–3 wks
Dermatology A layer of dried serum from an open wound
Seismology The outer layer of the Earth’s surface

crust

(krŭst)
1. A hard outer layer or covering; cutaneous crusts are often formed by dried serum or pus on the surface of a ruptured blister or pustule.
2. A scab.
Synonym(s): crusta.
[L. crusta]

crust

(krŭst)
1. A hard outer layer or covering; cutaneous crusts are often formed by dried serum or pus on the surface of a ruptured blister or pustule.
2. A scab.
[L. crusta]

crust,

n a hard-coating surface layer composed of coagulated tissue fluid and blood products mixed with epithelial and inflammatory cells covering a lesion formed by the rupture of a bulla, vesicle, or pustule.

crust

a formed outer layer, especially an outer layer of solid matter formed by drying of a bodily exudate or secretion. It may be serocellular or hemorrhagic.

palisading crust
there are alternating layers of cellular debris and exudate; typical of fungal infections of the skin and dermatophilosis.
waxy crust
typical of exudative epidermitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1: Presenting symptoms and signs of patients Symptoms Present Signs Present study study Crusting 41 (100%) Crust formation 41 (100%) Feter 40 (97.
Agassi M, Shainberg I, Morin J (1981) Effect of electrolyte concentration and soil sodicity on infiltration rate and crust formation.
Bresler E, Kemper WD (1970) Soil water evaporation as affected by wetting methods and crust formation.
The considerably higher infiltration rates of the non-trafficked, compared to the trafficked interrows of CP, particularly for Runs 3 and 4, appear related to three factors: compaction due to wheel traffic, increased surface storage of water due to greater surface roughness, and less extensive crust formation due to greater residue cover in the non-trafficked interrow.
The continental crust formation modified the composition of the mantle and the atmosphere, it supports life and it remains a sink for carbon dioxide through weathering and erosion.
He had a 3-year history of crust formation and nasal obstruction.
1991) was used to measure rate of crust formation under rainfall.
Since the mid-1980s, Shainberg had been exploring PAMs' ability to reduce soil compaction and crust formation by rain.
The papules, pustules, moist erythematous appearance and crust formation are characteristic clinical feature of pyoderma.
Crust formation at soil surfaces, because of the impact energy of raindrops or sprinkler irrigation, is a common feature of many cultivated soils worldwide.
In the past, scientists have used ophiolites -- slivers of ancient seafloor that have been pushed up onto the continents -- as an accessible analog for studying ocean crust formation.
All affected birds showed symptoms like depression, dullness, inappetance, redness of conjunctiva in early stages and crust formation in later stages.