Crotalus

(redirected from Crotalus atrox)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Crotalus atrox: Western diamondback rattlesnake

Crotalus

 [krot´ah-lus]
a large genus of venomous rattlesnakes with numerous species in North America and others in Central and South America. See also snakebite.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Crotalus

(krot'ă-lŭs),
A genus of rattlesnakes (family Crotalidae) native to North America, having large fangs that are replaced periodically throughout life and a venom that is both neurotoxic and hemolytic. The largest species are the diamondbacks of the southern states (Crotalus adamanteus) and western states (Crotalus atrox); the smallest are the pigmy rattlers (Sistrurus miliarius barbouri, S. miliarius streckeri, and S. miliarius miliarius.
[G. krotalon, a rattle, fr. krotos, a rattling noise]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Life history traits of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) studied from roundup samples in Oklahoma.
The western diamond-backed rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) is a strict carnivore and an important meso-predator across a variety of biotic communities in the Southwest (Nowak et al., 2008).
Eight western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox,) were exposed to 6 stimuli: (1) clean, unused bedding; (2) an adult male mouse; (3) an adult lactating female mouse; (4) an adult lactating female mouse with a litter; (5) 2 adult nonlactating female mice, to control for the extra surface area in Condition 4; and (6) a litter of newborn mice.
Female reproduction in the western diamond-backed rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox (Serpentes: Viperidae), from Arizona.
After initially putting Western diamondbacks (Crotalus atrox) on a regular feeding regimen of one mouse every 2 weeks for 6 months, McCue suddenly gave them only water.
Tetrathyridia have been previously found in Masticophis flagellum from Texas by Conn and McAllister (1990) and from Crotalus atrox, C.
Orientation and behavior of the Rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox. Copeia, 1973: 26-31.
Some observations on the development of Porocephalus crotali (Pentastomida: Porocephalidae) in the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox).
Subjects were 12 rattlesnakes (3 Crotalus atrox, 3 Crotalus oreganus oreganus, 3 Crotalus oreganus lutosus, and 3 Crotalus oreganus helleri).
Female reproduction in the western diamondbacked rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox (Serpentes: Viperidae) from Arizona.
This is in contrast to the western rattlesnake, Crotalus viridis, the western diamondback rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, the Mojave rattlesnake, Crotalus scutulatus and the tiger rattlesnake, Crotalus tigris in which the major period of spermiogenesis occurs in summer-autnumn (Aldridge 1979a, Jacob et al.
Male and female western diamondback rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) also deserve a medal for muscle speed, as they can rattle their tails 90 times per second.