cross-sectional

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Related to Cross-sectional data: Longitudinal data

cross-sec·tion·al

(kros'sek'shŭn-ăl),
1. In histology, a sectioning of a tissue or organ perpendicular to its longitudinal axis.
2. Relating to planar sections of an anatomic or other structure.
See: synchronic.

cross-sectional

Etymology: L, crux + secare, to cut
(in statistics) pertaining to the sampling of a defined population at one point in time, performed in a nonexperimental research design. Compare longitudinal.

cross-sec·tion·al

(kraws sekshŭn-ăl)
Relating to planar sections of an anatomic or other structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Models using the MLE method include BC88, BC92, KUM, and Cuesta (2000), and these impose the same restrictions as do the cross-sectional data models: a specific one-sided distribution of technical inefficiency, the iid normal distribution of statistical noise, and the uncorrelation between input variables and inefficiency.
They used cross-sectional data from the 2002 GEM for the analysis; these data are from individuals located in Belgium and Finland.
NHANES and other cross-sectional data sets can appropriately be used for hypothesis-generating analyses, most appropriately when combined with other information to inform the exploratory analyses.
Comparing health inequalities across time and place--rate ratios and rate differences lead to different conclusions: analysis of cross-sectional data from 22 countries 1991-2001.
1) However, Levine and ReneWs study was limited to a linear relationship in cross-sectional data averaged over 30 years, and subsequent work has shown that inflation's effects are more pronounced in higher frequency data and also non-linear.
One criticism involves the heavy reliance of past research on cross-sectional data gathering.
Cross-sectional data were collected during 2003 using UN process indicators.
Previous epidemiologic studies used office samples or cross-sectional data from patient recall to estimate the prevalence of common GI symptoms in children.
Despite the limitations of the available data, treating them as an industry-level panel data set (a time-series of cross-sectional data on industries) can deliver valuable insights into the relationship between working time and workplace safety.
To avoid such negative effects, we need to avoid a one-time assessment, which in essence means changing the bases of identification from cross-sectional data to longitudinal data.
A cross-sectional data set measures the same variables over the same period of time for two or more economic entities.
This function also can be defined by measuring advertising with cross-sectional data from local markets.