gender

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gender

 [jen´der]
sex (def. 1); see also gender identity and gender role.
gender identity disorder a disturbance of gender identification in which the affected person has an overwhelming desire to change their anatomic sex or insists that they are of the opposite sex, with persistent discomfort about their assigned sex or about filling its usual gender role; the disorder may become apparent in childhood or not appear until adolescence or adulthood. Individuals may attempt to live as members of the opposite sex and may seek hormonal and surgical treatment to bring their anatomy into conformity with their belief (see transsexualism). It is not the same as transvestism.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr),
Category to which an individual is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex. Compare: sex, gender role.

gender

/gen·der/ (jen´der) sex; the category to which an individual is assigned on the basis of sex.

gender

(jĕn′dər)
n.
1. Grammar
a. A grammatical category, often designated as male, female, or neuter, used in the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, and, in some languages, verbs that may be arbitrary or based on characteristics such as sex or animacy and that determines agreement with or selection of modifiers, referents, or grammatical forms.
b. The fact of being classified as belonging to such a category: agreement in gender, number, and case.
2.
a. Either of the two divisions, designated female and male, by which most organisms are classified on the basis of their reproductive organs and functions; sex.
b. One's identity as female or male or as neither entirely female nor entirely male.
c. Females or males considered as a group: Students lined up with the genders in different lines.
tr.v. gen·dered, gen·dering, gen·ders Archaic
To engender.

gen′der·less adj.

gender

[jen′dər]
Etymology: L, genus, kind
1 the classification of the sex of a person into male, female, or ambivalent.
2 the specific sex of a person. See also sex.

gender

The sex with which a person identifies him- or herself.

gender

Sex; one's personal, social, and legal status as ♂ or ♀, based on body and behavior, not on genital and/or erotic criteria. See Gender-identity/role.

gen·der

(jen'dĕr)
Category to which a person is assigned by self or others, on the basis of sex.
Compare: sex, gender role
[fr. L. genus, kind]

gender

A classification of organisms based on their sex. From the Latin genus , a kind.

gender

(1) in general use, synonym for biological sex; (2) the socially constructed views of feminine and masculine behaviour within individual cultural groups. gender identity a person's sense of their biological sex. gender role the set of behaviours, attitudes and other characteristics normally associated with masculinity and femininity within a given culture or social group; for example, certain sports are stereotypically viewed as reflecting a masculine role (e.g. basketball) whereas others reflect a feminine role (e.g. netball).

gender

anatomical sex of the individual

gender

sex; the category to which an individual is assigned on the basis of sex.

Patient discussion about gender

Q. In which month of pregnancy it's possible to determine gender of the fetus?

A. following marin's question - is there a difference when it comes to twins?

Q. Which gender is on the high risk of fibromyalgia and what may be the cause?

A. It’s generally found with women. Any women having family history of fibromyalgia is more likely to suffer from fibromyalgia. Causes are unknown. Factors known to cause are that some people with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and spinal arthritis may be more likely to have fibromyalgia, too. Researchers suspect that some genes may stimulate pain in patients with fibromyalgia though there is no proof to that effect.

More discussions about gender
References in periodicals archive ?
13) Fryes model of comedy becomes even further complicated in performance, especially by productions that employ cross-gender casting.
Outside the home and ethnic community, however, they are surrounded by others who are allowed to form cross-gender relationships and even encouraged to do so.
Studies examining whether a desire to be of the other sex should become a distinct diagnostic criterion are inconclusive, possibly due to frequent co-occurrence but not a complete overlap of cross-sex desires with cross-gender behaviors.
Within seven months, the corrections lieutenants' union and its executive director appealed part of the judge's order, reigniting the battle over cross-gender supervision.
Finally, counselors should discuss both challenges and supports to working in cross-gender occupations.
Identifying herself with the "new institutionalists" who have tried to bring the insights of a more cultural approach into the workplace, DeVault focuses our attention on 40 cross-gender strikes in four industries where there is a clear gender division of labour but also an interdependent production process.
Our hypothesis about gender similarity and stewards' verbal persuasion is as follows: gender similarity and verbal persuasion by a steward interact to influence self-efficacy to serve as a steward, such that the influence of verbal persuasion on self-efficacy will be strongest for same-gender cases and weakest for cross-gender cases.
Supreme Court decisions covering such issues as use of force, deaths in custody, medical/psychiatric care, and cross-gender supervision.
Despite company efforts, workers remained interested in unionization--although certainly not broad cross-racial, cross-gender unions.
Most children who meet the diagnosis for GID become transsexuals, and early cross-gender behavior often leads to homosexuality.
Because of the irreversible nature of sex-change surgery, candidates are often required to spend a period of time integrating themselves into the cross-gender role before the opis carried out.
1989) Gender differences in adults' same and cross-gender friend ships.