cross-cultural

(redirected from Cross-culturalism)
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cross-cultural

 [kros″kul´cher-al]
pertaining to the identification and analysis of distinct features of human behavior in different cultural, geographic, and social settings; intercultural and transcultural are sometimes substituted for this term.

cross-cultural

Concerning the physiological and social differences and similarities of two or more cultures.
References in periodicals archive ?
The passage makes clear the embrace of cross-culturalism and the endeavour to break free from the restrictions of ethnocentrism, including the archetypal tendency to dissolve in the WASP melting pot.
Did you feel the client/family's perception was influenced by cross-culturalism (in contrast to music therapy services provided by a therapist within the same culture)?
Having emerged in the Social Sciences in the 1930s, cross-culturalism initially referred to comparative studies based on statistical compilations of cultural data.
The Jungian foundation is modified by adding Freud, the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator, the post-Freudians including object theorists, Lacan, Derrida, and Bhabha; "[c]ombining these various approaches enables us to arrive at a broad theory capable of identifying and distinguishing common forms of cross-culturalism in terms of the various stages and sites of repression: primal repression, repression within the personality, and cultural represon" (11).
attitudes toward cross-culturalism may not strike the same chords with locals and the Indian diaspora that made "Bend It Like Beckham" such a hit in Blighty.
Whether you call it multiculturalism, cross-culturalism or whatever, we still have some educating to do and some hurdles to overcome.
As Harris goes on to say, this focus on the layers of myth engenders a creative cross-culturalism in which the dynamic resources that lie at the heart of myth can be visualized as a response to the dilemmas of the present.
Musically speaking, you could say he adheres to a philosophy of cross-culturalism mixed with Hasidic humanism.
Still, this thin plot is but a mere pretext for Bouraoui to explore the dynamics of cross-culturalism from the vantage point of his own worldly and cosmopolitan experience.
His professional interests relate to cross-culturalism and reading in a foreign language.
Quinones' report explores the major shift in attitude toward Latinos in this country, taking a historic look back as well as ahead to a future of growing cross-culturalism.