apparatus

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apparatus

 [ap″ah-rat´tus] (pl. appara´tus, apparatuses)
an arrangement of a number of parts acting together to perform a special function.
Golgi apparatus see golgi apparatus.
juxtaglomerular apparatus a collective term for the juxtaglomerular cells in a nephron.
lacrimal apparatus see lacrimal apparatus.
Wangensteen's apparatus a nasal suction apparatus connected with a duodenal tube for aspirating gas and fluid from stomach and intestine.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ap·pa·ra·tus

(ap'ă-rā'tŭs), The plural of this word is apparatus, not apparati.
1. A collection of instruments adapted for a special purpose.
See also: system.
2. An instrument made up of several parts.
See also: system.
3. A group or system of glands, ducts, blood vessels, muscles, or other anatomic structures involved in the performance of some function.
See also: system.
[L. equipment. fr. ap-paro, pp. -atus, to prepare]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

apparatus

(ăp′ə-răt′əs, -rā′təs)
n. pl. apparatus or apparat·uses
1.
a. An appliance or device for a particular purpose: an x-ray apparatus.
b. An integrated group of materials or devices used for a particular purpose: dental apparatus.
2. Physiology A group or system of organs that collectively perform a specific function or process: the respiratory apparatus; the digestive apparatus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

apparatus

Anatomy
An integrated group of structurally and functionally linked parts (including muscles, nerves, blood and lymphatic vessels, glands, stroma and so on) which act in concert to perform a particular function, as in digestion, which is performed by the alimentary apparatus (now preferentially known as the GI tract).

The use and translation of the anatomic term apparatus has proven problematic, as each information consumer views the scope (structure and function) of an apparatus in a distinct manner, and there are number of translations thereof (i.e., organs, system and tract).
 
The traditional and formally sanctioned uses of the term apparatus notwithstanding, ultimately the term system (as applied to the digestive, respiratory and urogenital apparatuses) is increasingly preferred.

Technology
A structurally and functionally integrated device used to perform a particular task.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ap·pa·ra·tus

(ap'ă-rat'ŭs)
1. A collection of instruments adapted for a special purpose.
2. An instrument made up of several parts.
3. A group or system of glands, ducts, blood vessels, muscles, or other anatomic structures involved in the performance of some function.
See also: system
[L. equipment. fr. ap-paro, pp. -atus, to prepare]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

ap·pa·ra·tus

(ap'ă-rat'ŭs) The plural of this word is apparatus, not apparati.
1. [TA] A collection of instruments adapted for a special purpose.
2. An instrument made up of several parts.
3. [TA] A group or system of glands, ducts, blood vessels, muscles, or other anatomic structures involved in the performance of some function.
See also: system
[L. equipment. fr. ap-paro, pp. -atus, to prepare]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Should he burden his Vulgate text with its own critical apparatus, to show where variations occur in contemporary manuscripts, or should he become a Vulgate editor himself and doctor the text to match as near as possible the translator's version (a procedure not unknown among editors of Old English texts)?
The approach of these editions follows closely in the wake of the sibling Rossini and Verdi projects--hence, the operas come with a thick critical apparatus complementing the score.
The Latin text is supported by a well prepared and substantiated, but not needlessly expanded, critical apparatus. It provides all the differences in the manuscripts apart from orthographical variations.
If such a wide-ranging critical apparatus and extensive translation inevitably raises a few quibbles (it is misleading to quote the initial printrun of only the unillustrated edition; a typographical error remains on p.
Using a combination of thorough archival research and a sound critical apparatus, Beate Muller has written a convincing case for a more differentiated approach to the analysis of literature and censorship in the GDR than has generally been offered hitherto, one in which the Stasi was just one factor in a landscape of changing coalitions.
Delaplace and Champion have, however, given us a scrupulously accurate edition of the 1596 editio princeps, with variants and extensive critical apparatus and commentary.
Despite playing with the usual critical apparatus, Combuchen's analysis of the man and the writer should be just as attractive to academics as it will be to readers with no idea of who Knut Hamsun was.
One of its most distinctive features is that the critical apparatus for the Hebrew and Greek texts is provided in electronic format.
Readers who do not or will not accept the self-imposed limits of Obeyesekere's project will be frustrated by the lack of historical context provided in the introductory material and the absence of critical apparatus or philological detail.
In those two short years, the critical apparatus of the '80s had clearly lost some of its luster in the eyes of at least one professor, though I'm sure he wasn't alone, and I hope it had nothing to do with my deeply earnest paper on Barbara Kruger, Jenny Holzer, and the "subversion of the stereotype."
Like Carroll -- and the great majority of scriptural scholars -- she sees "Jesus' renewal movement" and the "Pharisaic movement" as lively, occasionally conflicting, elements within Second Temple Judaism; and so she roundly condemns the Christian caricature of Pharisees as "legalistic, self-righteous hypocrites." Borrowing from Laurence Hall Stookey (Boys' text is dense with quotation and has a hefty critical apparatus), she describes four different Christian approaches to Judaism in the form of "typological lenses" for viewing parallel O.T.
Parker takes this third edition as the basic text, noting earlier variants in the critical apparatus, which also supplies useful source notes for the commentators with whom Calvin was in conversation.

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