liability

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liability

[līəbil′itē]
Etymology: L, ligare, to bind
1 something one is obligated to do or an obligation required to be fulfilled by law, usually financial in nature.
2 the amount of money required to fulfill a financial obligation.
Health insurance The potential for paying claims based on use of an insured service
Malpractice All character of obligation, amenability, and responsibility for an act before the law

liability

Malpractice All character of obligation, amenability, and responsibility for an act before the law. See Corporate liability, Current liability, Limits of liability, Malpractice Product liability, Professional liability, Strict liability.

liability (līəbil´itē),

n the state of being bound by law or justice to do something or to make good something; legal responsibility.

liability

financial or legal responsibility.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, because of liability deflection, managers may not want the corporation to lobby against corporate criminal liability.
3) Gabriel Hallevy, "'I, Robot - I, Criminal' - When Science Fiction Becomes Reality: Legal Liability of AI Robots committing Criminal Offenses" (2010) 22 Syracuse Science & Technology L Report 1; Gabriel Hallevy, "The Criminal Liability of Artificial Intelligence Entities - From Science Fiction to Legal Social Control" (2010) 4:2 Akron Intellectual Property J 171; Gabriel Hallevy, "Unmanned Vehicles: Subordination to Criminal Law under the Modern Concept of Criminal Liability" (2011) 21:2 J L Info & Sci 200.
the law forbids by limiting criminal liability to someone who
But Bittle's analysis reveals that discursive formations also played an important role in shaping the opportunities available to politicians seeking to blunt efforts to increase corporate criminal liability and, perhaps, also shaped legislators' thinking.
Some European countries have expanded their administrative regulation or even experimented with corporate criminal liability.
The only problem with this definition of corporate criminal liability is that it violates all three of the necessary conditions for criminal responsibility.
The threat of going out of business may be an inferior deterrent in those firms for which entity-level criminal liability is important from a deterrence perspective.
The doctrine of corporate criminal liability is notoriously
With federal law C-45, which amends the Criminal Code to increase the potential for criminal liability for workplace injuries or fatalities, now in effect, companies now more than ever are being held more accountable for safety oversights.
Both of these provisions subject PCA employees to civil and criminal liability.