genocide

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genocide

[jen′əsīd]
the systematic extermination of a national, ethnic, political, religious, or other population.
The systematic killing of a select group of individuals in a population that is sanctioned by a country’s leaders, thereby constituting a policy, which may have the local medical community’s implied support.

genocide

(jĕn′ō-sīd″) [Gr. genos, race, + L. caedere, to kill]
The willful and planned murder of a particular social or ethnic group.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some scholars wonder whether the Katyn Massacre may be considered an act of genocide, given the fact that the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide was only adopted in 1948.
The paper generates insights about the nature and use of criminal trials, the global cybercrime industry, and the crime of genocide.
May writes that the act element of the crime of genocide is in need of revision.
In examining first the provisions on genocide in article 4(3), the question raised is whether the activities outlined in subparagraphs (b)-(e) of article 4(3) constitute crimes in and of themselves, or whether they are forms of responsibility for the more general crime of genocide.
In accordance with the definition provided in the Genocide Convention and other instruments, the necessary elements of the crime of genocide can be indicated as follows: The acts (indicated through a-e in the Convention), the victimized (protected) group (membership of a national, ethnic, racial or religious group) and the intent (to destroy, in whole or in part the protected group).
As perhaps the only monograph claiming to be a criminology of wartime crimes, Darfur and the Crime of Genocide is a welcome addition to a nascent area of inquiry within criminology.
Message on the 60th anniversary of the convention on the prevention and punishment of the crime of genocide
7) Moreover, the ad hoc Tribunals have developed a significant body of legal precedent with respect to the crime of genocide that is now available to future tribunals should the need arise.
The crime of genocide is singled out for special condemnation and opprobrium.
government and its people should rededicate themselves to the cause of ending the crime of genocide.
Lemkin's achievement was the 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, which defined genocide as "any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group, as such: Killing members of the group; Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group; Deliberately inflicting on the group the condition of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part; Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group; Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

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