cremate

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cremate

(krē′māt″, kri-māt′) [L. cremare, to burn to ashes]
To reduce a dead body to ash by burning.
cremation (kri-mā′shŏn)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other fundamental differences between communist ideology, fundamentally based on the idea of a community and the individualism specific to numerous cremationists are overlooked.
(26) The struggle of the cremationists for legitimating themselves in an autonomous manner not in a relational one, like the opposite of Christian religion, is portrayed and explain in Marius Rotar's book.
Cremationists ultimately employed these ideas and activities to fit their own goals.
Gardens of Rest or Remembrance had become "necessary adjuncts to a crematorium." (54) Yet this advocacy also directly related to providing the very opposite of the grim, desolate and lifeless battlefield by creating "joyous playgrounds of the young" with a site "bereft of those dismal, depressing emblems of death and decay." Lane argued that cremationists aimed to address the "morbid condition" of grief that essentially seemed omnipresent at the time.
Cremationists also positioned themselves well to ride this wave of invented tradition with a vision the group's secretary called fifty years ahead of its time.
The imperviousness British cremationists asserted in the face of hostile opponents could be viewed as inspiring or arrogant, depending on one's feelings about cremation.
Indeed, the Church has maintained, and continues to maintain, that early cremationists were simply Freemasons or anti-clericals expressing their irreligion and materialism, that is, asserting their contempt for Catholicism by other means.
The first would have rehabilitated Italian (and French) cremationists past and present, whereas the latter would allow the Church to maintain that its previous conclusions had been correct and only recently had the cremation movement changed.
Around 1940, Italian and especially German cremationists could have made the case that they led Europe's cremation movement and the ICF.
This term meant something particular to the cremationists, though I would argue its significance changed after the First World War.