Aphanomyces astaci

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Aphanomyces astaci

fungal cause of crayfish plague.
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In Wales, our native crayfish, fully protected by law, are nearing extinction due to crayfish plague.
Coun Lloyd added: "Unfortunately, the publicly accessible nature of Ensor's Pool has meant it has always been relatively vulnerable to crayfish plague, which can be transmitted on damp or wet items including fishing equipment, boats and inflatables, dogs and on wellington boots.
leniusculus not carrying the crayfish plague, suggesting that long term displacement can occur, aided by higher fecundity, faster growth rate, and earlier hatching (Vorburger and Ribi, 1999).
And crayfish plague can also be transferred between water bodies, for example on fishing tackle or boats.
Pacifastacus leniusculus is similar in many ways to Astacus astacus (Linnaeus, 1758) and consequently has proved popular alternative since the decline of the latter species due to the introduction crayfish plague into many Europe catchments (Holdich, 1999).
Spherical baculovirosis (Penaeus monodon-type baculovirus); Infectious hypodermal and haematopoietic necrosis; and Crayfish plague (Aphanomyces astaci).
This carries a fungal disease known as crayfish plague and the white-clawed crayfish is susceptible to it.
Contract Awarded for revision of aquavetplan disease strategy manual - crayfish plague
The white-clawed crayfish is Ireland and Britain's only native freshwater crayfish and around 95% of populations here have already been lost, largely because of the introduction of American signal crayfish and crayfish plague.
Research is also being undertaken into ways to eradicate non-native crayfish species, as well as the crayfish plague, but a solution has yet to be found.