craniopharyngioma

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Related to Craniopharyngiomas: Pituitary tumors

craniopharyngioma

 [kra″ne-o-fah-rin″je-o´mah]
a tumor arising from cell rests derived from Rathke's pouch or some other part of the pituitary gland, often destroying the gland and causing deficits of the pituitary hormones.

cra·ni·o·pha·ryn·gi·o·ma

(krā'nē-ō-fă-rin'jē-ō'mă),
A suprasellar neoplasm that may be cystic; develops from the nests of epithelium derived from Rathke pouch; the histologic pattern, similar to that observed in adamantinomas, consists of nesting of squamous epithelium bordered by radially arranged cells; frequently accompanied by calcium deposition; may occassionally have a papillary architecture microscopically.
[cranio- + pharyngio- + -oma]

craniopharyngioma

Neurology A benign 1º pituitary tumor that is often functionally active, secreting ↑ pituitary hormones–eg, hGH, causing gigantism–if prepubertal and acromegaly—in adults; they comprise < 5% of brain tumors of children Clinical Changed vision, headache, weight gain Treatment Surgery + RT. See Histologically benign.

cra·ni·o·pha·ryn·gi·o·ma

(krā'nē-ō-făr-in'jē-ō'mă)
A suprasellar neoplasm that develops from Rathke pouch; the histologic pattern consists of nesting of squamous epithelium bordered by radially arranged cells.
Synonym(s): Rathke pouch tumor.
[cranio- + pharyngio- + -oma]

craniopharyngioma

A brain tumour affecting mainly children and arising from persistent primitive cells in the region of the pituitary gland. It causes headaches, visual field loss and delayed physical and mental development. Treatment is by surgical removal.

Craniopharyngioma

A tumor near the pituitary gland in the craniopharyngeal canal that often results in intracranial pressure.
Mentioned in: Pituitary Dwarfism

Erdheim,

Jakob, Austrian physician, 1874-1937.
Erdheim disease - a disease of unknown cause that may be inherited and that predisposes to dissecting aneurysms. Synonym(s): cystic medial necrosis
Erdheim syndrome - acromegaly causing cervical stiffening and often associated with clavicular hypertrophy. Synonym(s): Scaglietti-Dagnini syndrome
Erdheim tumor - a suprasellar neoplasm, usually cystic, that develops from the nests of epithelium derived from Rathke pouch. Synonym(s): craniopharyngioma

Rathke,

Martin H., German anatomist, physiologist, and pathologist, 1793-1860.
Rathke bundles - muscular bundles on the lining walls of the ventricles of the heart. Synonym(s): trabeculae carneae
Rathke cleft cyst - an intrasellar or suprasellar cyst lined by cuboidal epithelium derived from remnants of Rathke pouch. Synonym(s): Rathke cyst
Rathke column
Rathke cyst - Synonym(s): Rathke cleft cyst
Rathke diverticulum - a tubular outgrowth of ectoderm from the stomodeum of the embryo. Synonym(s): pituitary diverticulum; Rathke pocket; Rathke pouch
Rathke duct
Rathke fold - two fetal folds of mesoderm.
Rathke pocket - Synonym(s): Rathke diverticulum
Rathke pouch - Synonym(s): Rathke diverticulum
Rathke pouch tumor - a suprasellar neoplasm, usually cystic, that develops from the nests of epithelium derived from Rathke pouch. Synonym(s): craniopharyngioma
Rathke punch

cra·ni·o·pha·ryn·gi·o·ma

(krā'nē-ō-făr-in'jē-ō'mă)
A suprasellar neoplasm that develops from the Rathke pouch.
Synonym(s): Rathke pouch tumor.
[cranio- + pharyngio- + -oma]
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly, few DNETS and 2 craniopharyngiomas showed minimal lactate peak in the cystic component of the lesion.
Thus, craniopharyngiomas can potentially arise anywhere along the migration of Rathke's pouch, such as the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, third ventricle, and posterior fossa.
The five most common causes of hypopituitarism in our database were nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (205 patients; 40.5%), followed by congenital causes (74 patients; 14.6%), acromegaly (37 patients, 7.2%), prolactinomas (36 patients, 7.0%), and craniopharyngioma (30 patients; 5.9%).
Eventually, the patient received the diagnosis of suprasellar tumor inclined to craniopharyngioma before operation.
Craniopharyngiomas in children and adults: systematic analysis of 121 cases with long-term follow-up.
However, in cases with slow growth, their discovery is often postponed up to the fourth and fifth decade of life, making craniopharyngiomas part of adult pathology.
Craniopharyngiomas treatment has various options; however there are two main alternatives that are typically used: one is an aggressive gross surgical removal leading to a complete resection, and the other is more conservative, using radiation therapy when a partial resection has been made or when the lesion has recurred.
Their topics include cognitive principles of planning keyhole approaches, the role of endoscopy in keyhole surgery, endonasal surgery and its current role in neurosurgical paradigms, craniopharyngiomas, and tackling the petrous apex through a keyhole.
(27, 38-40) More recently, BRAF mutations have been identified in papillary craniopharyngiomas. (41)
But unlike teratomas, Craniopharyngiomas contain a single layer of tissue.
Paixao et al., "CTNNB1 gene mutations, pituitary transcription factors, and MicroRNA expression involvement in the pathogenesis of adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas," Hormones and Cancer, vol.