craniopagus


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craniopagus

 [kra″ne-op´ah-gus]
conjoined twins that are joined at the skull.

cra·ni·op·a·gus

(krā-nē-op'ă-gus),
A type of conjoined twin united on any portion of the cranial vault or calvarium not involving the foramen magnum, skull base, face, or vertebrae. The juncture is rarely symmetric and may involve the entire head or only a portion and may include the meninges, venous sinuses, and the cerebral cortex. Infinite variations exist in both axial and rotational orientation. Type 1, twins are facing the same direction; type 2, twins are facing the opposite direction; type 3, twins are facing 90° from one another.
[cranio- + G. pagos, something fixed]
References in periodicals archive ?
They believe there could be up to six sets of craniopagus twins born worldwide each year who might be successfully separated.
Rebeca was only the eighth documented case in the world of craniopagus parasitic us.
But some raised questions about whether or not the procedure, the first-ever attempt to separate adult craniopagus twins, should have been attempted.
Ladan and Laleh were the first adult craniopagus twins on whom surgical separation was attempted.
Medical Modeling President Andy Christensen had encountered this "craniopagus twinning" before, building models of a pair of Cairo twins who had come to Dallas for potential surgery.
This was the first time surgeons tried to separate adult craniopagus twins -siblings born joined at the head.
This was the first time surgeons tried to separate adult craniopagus twins - siblings born joined at the head.
It was the first time surgeons had attempted to separate adult craniopagus twins -siblings born joined at the head -since the operation was first performed on infants in 1952.
It was the first time surgeons had attempted to separate adult craniopagus twins - siblings born joined at the head - since the operation was first performed on infants in 1952.
In July of this year, surgeons and medical professions at the UCLA Mattel Children's Hospital were faced with a unique and complex problem--the separation of craniopagus twins.
Carson was the primary neurosurgeon among the 70-member medical team that successfully separated seven-month-old German craniopagus twin boys ("Siamese Twins").