cranial sutures


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Related to cranial sutures: metopic suture

cra·ni·al su·tures

[TA]
the sutures between the bones of the skull.
Synonym(s): suturae cranii [TA]

cra·ni·al su·tures

(krā'nē-ăl sū'chŭrz) [TA]
The sutures between the bones of the skull.

cra·ni·al su·tures

(krā'nē-ăl sū'chŭrz) [TA]
Sutures between the bones of the cranium.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pubic Symphysis Auricular Surface Cranial Sutures Ages Bias Inaccuracy Bias Inaccuracy Bias Inaccuracy 16-20 -1.05 2.15 2.68 6.28 4.96 5.36 21-30 -0.17 5.31 -3.11 6.11 -5.60 8.85 31-40 3.50 10.10 0.52 11.27 4.16 24.13 41-60 -4.84 16.57 -6.88 11.60 -29.35 29.35 61-70 10.35 19.80 16.09 25.00 -15.08 31.88 71-83 22.60 22.60 18.88 18.88 -15.74 22.46 All Structures Ages Bias Inaccuracy 16-20 -1.11 1.75 21-30 -1.14 5.10 31-40 -0.54 8.05 41-60 -11.56 12.50 61-70 -1.76 13.76 71-83 2.37 5.80 TABLE 2--Gwet's ACI values of pubic symphysis traits for the combined sex subsample.
Moreover, it had two advantages: first, the coordinate system could be defined easily during the operation because the scalp covering the zygomatic arch, FPZ, SMC, and the mastoid is thin enough to palpate points A, B, and C; second, this positioning system does not need recognition of the cranial sutures (the lambdoidal, squamosal, and parietomastoid sutures) which should be identified for using the traditional method to locate the IMTS.[sup][9]
Degree of closure was scored in 16 parts of the main cranial sutures as done by Acsadi-Nemeskeri.
blainvillei and the fusion (or closure) pattern of cranial sutures, as well as to determine if the species shows directional asymmetry in suture closure.
compile 19 chapters examining the phenomenon of the fusion of the cranial sutures of an infant's skull.
These include: the inion process, the mastoid process, the frontal ridges, the dentition (Miles, 1958), the dental arch, the shape of the chin, the shape of the angular process, the zygomatic arch, the cranial sutures, and the overall thickness of the cranial bones (Bass, 1971).
The cranial sutures are open and normal, therefore conservative management, such as physiotherapy and helmet therapy, is frequently used to treat this condition.
Differential diagnosis should be made to exclude craniosyntosis, which is a more serious condition involving premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. (2) Craniosyntosis usually requires surgical intervention to prevent more serious deformity and possible brain damage.
The porosity of the bones appears towards the margins of, and parallel to, cranial sutures but does not extend to the sutures themselves.
The cranial sutures are a physiological mechanism designed to accommodate or adapt to the existing anatomical make-up, with or without an imposed strain or restriction being present.
Craniosynostosis, or premature closure of the cranial sutures, occurs in 1:2,100 children (Lajeunie et al., 1995; see Fig.
The 3-D images of the skull are superior to the conventional 2-D view that is often limited to the cranial sutures due to the natural curvature of the skull.