cranberry

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cranberry

an herbal product whose berries are harvested from a small shrub found in the United States from Alaska to Tennessee.
uses It is used for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and works by decreasing bacterial adherence to the walls of the bladder, urethra, and so on. Although likely effective to some degree, patients should not rely on cranberry juice for treating UTIs.
contraindications Those with known hypersensitivity, oliguria, or anuria should not use cranberry.

cranberry

(krăn′bĕr-ē)
A tart red fruit, Vaccinium macrocarpon, commonly used in the treatment and prevention of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Evidence supporting cranberry as treatment of UTIs is limited. Whether drinking cranberry juice is as effective in preventing UTIs as chronic antibiotic use is unknown. Its mechanism of action is to decrease adherence of some bacteria to the urothelium.

cranberry,

n Latin names:
Vaccinium macrocarpon, Vaccinium oxycoccus, Vaccinium erythrocarpum; part used: berries; uses: kidney stones, prevention of urinary tract infections; precautions: patients with oliguria or anuria. Also called
bog cranberry, isokarpalo, marsh apple, mountain cranberry, and
pikkukarpalo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite promising results from some studies, the debate among experts on the efficacy of cranberries for UTIs continues.
Ninety-five percent of cranberries that are eaten are cooked first.
They worked out that people who consumed a lot of cranberries produced purer, odor free urine.
But that's not the only reason to toss a couple of bags of cranberries into your cart.
Emerging research suggests that cranberries' high concentration of antioxidants can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, that cranberries may keep certain oral bacteria from attaching to teeth and gums, and that PACS may help prevent H.
As a rich source of antioxidants, cranberries are being intensively studied for their anti-aging potential and as a means to improve cardiovascular health and the body's ability to fend off cancers.
The biggest misconception that people have about the cranberry industry is they believe that cranberries grow in water," Bob says.
Consumers love the great taste and texture that Real Yorkshire Wensleydale with Cranberries offers", said Sandra Bell, marketing manager at The Wensleydale Creamery.
In the 1840s German scientists researched the connection between cranberries and urinary tract infections (UTIs) after noting that urinary excretion of hippuric acid increased after ingestion of cranberries, which are bacteriostatic in high concentrations (Hutchinson 2005, Ulbricht 2005, Siciliano 1996).
Cranberries have been found to prevent the symptomatic recurrences of urinary tract infection, which females are more likely to be vulnerable to.
You may already be aware that research has confirmed that cranberries are among the highest sources of antioxidants of all foods tested.