Coxiella burnetii


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Cox·i·el·la bur·ne·ti·i

a bacterial species that causes Q fever in humans; it is more resistant than other rickettsiae and may be passed in aerosols as well as in living vectors. Acute pneumonia and chronic endocarditis are also associated with this species. The type species of the genus Coxiella.

Coxiella burnetii

Infectious disease The single species of genus Coxiella, family Rickettsiaceae, a short, rod-shaped bacterium; it is global in distribution, causes Q fever, spreads by aerosol, primarily infects cattle, sheep, goats, multiplies well in the placenta, and is shed during parturition. See Q fever.

Cox·i·el·la bur·ne·ti·i

(kok-sē-el'ă bŭr-nē'shē-ī)
A species that causes Q fever in humans. It is more resistant than other rickettsiae and may be passed in aerosols as well as living vectors. Acute pneumonia and chronic endocarditis are also associated with this species. The type species of the genus Coxiella.
References in periodicals archive ?
Coxiellosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by a Gram-negative, obligate intracellular organism known as Coxiella burnetii. Although, the organism has wide range of hosts including domestic animals, rodents, reptiles, pets, birds, wild animals and arthropods, but ruminants, especially sheep and goats, are the main animal reservoirs and source of infection for humans (Van der Brom et al., 2015; Saglam and Sahin, 2016).
Coxiella burnetii is found in arthropods, rodents, and other animals.
Assim, em homenagem aos dois grupos de pesquisadores recebeu o nome de Coxiella burnetii (2,3,6).
(14) The best-known member of the genus is Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, a worldwide zoonotic disease that infects the phagolysosome of macrophages.
Hackstadt, "Differential interaction with endocytic and exocytic pathways distinguish parasitophorous vacuoles of Coxiella burnetii and chlamydia trachomatis," Infection and Immunity, vol.
In addition, there are rare reports of Coxiella burnetii infection presenting as mass lesions in the lung, mimicking malignant tumors radiographically [5, 6].
Background: Q fever endocarditis, a chronic illness caused by Coxiella burnetii, can be fatal if misdiagnosed or left untreated.
and Coxiella burnetii (phase 2 serology indicates a recent infection), which also cause culture-negative endocarditis.
Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular, Gram-negative bacteria that replicates inside host cell phagosomes.
During September-November 2014, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) was notified of five New York state residents who had tested seropositive for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever.
Q fever in California: Recovery of Coxiella Burnetii from naturally-infected airborne dust.