Cox proportional hazard model

Cox proportional hazard model

(koks),
a statistical model used in survival analysis to demonstrate the multiplicative effect of several designated study factors, showing that this effect does not change over time. It was invented by the British statistician D. R. Cox.
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4); the finding was the same in a Cox proportional hazard model that adjusted for the same factors.
Cox proportional hazard model was performed to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for admission serum TC levels.
In the literature, different models have been proposed for survival prediction, such as Cox proportional hazard model and the accelerated failure-time model [1].
Selected variables in univariate analysis were entered in a stepwise multivariate Cox proportional hazard model to determine independent contributions of predictors for the primary endpoint.
0001 nonfatal MI (a) Standardized HRs for log(suPAR) for all-cause mortality, HF, and fatal or nonfatal Ml In a Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for age and sex (multivariate model 1) from 6 months until 5 years of follow-up.
Cox proportional hazard model for suicide with mental disorders diagnoses as risk factors, adjusted for socio-demographic andjob related characteristics (Estimated effects of socio-demographic andjob related characteristics) parameter standard variable effect estimate error Gender Female v.
Table 3 depicts Cox proportional hazard model of relationship between timing of first marriage and region collapsed into North and South.
In a Cox proportional hazard model that further adjusted for the interval between PPI start to CDI attack or last follow-up, however, the association between PPI use and CDI was significant only for group 2 (hazard ratio, 1.
To empirically analyze this relationship, the duration of the KCHIP 3 enrollment spells described earlier is estimated using a Cox proportional hazard model with time-varying covariates to model the yearly recertification process and introduction of the premium.
The Cox proportional hazard model examined racial differences in recidivism risks controlling for the two covariates.