Cowden syndrome

(redirected from Cowden’s Disease)

Cowden syndrome

or

Cowden disease

(koud′n)
n.
An autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the formation of benign growths especially on the skin and mucous membranes and an increased risk of developing malignancies in the breast, thyroid, and other organs. Also called multiple hamartoma syndrome.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Cowden syndrome

A rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis (OMIM:158350) characterised by multiple hamartomas arising from all three germ cell layers, most prominently from the ectoderm and endoderm, in particular hamartomas of skin and the GI tract (from the stomach to the colon) and an increased risk of cancer (e.g., breast, thyroid (papillary or follicular), uterus and osteosarcoma). Women with Cowden syndrome have up to a 50% lifetime risk of developing breast cancer; 75% have benign breast disease (fibroadenomas, fibrocystic changes).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cowden disease

, Cowden syndrome (kowd'en) [ Cowden, family name of first patient described] Multiple hamartoma.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Cowden,

Rachel, the first patient to be described with this condition in 1963.
Cowden syndrome - an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple trichilemmomas occurring around the mouth, nose, and ears.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012