convergent evolution

(redirected from Covergent evolution)
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Related to Covergent evolution: Parallel evolution

evolution

 [ev″o-lu´shun]
the process of development in which an organ or organism becomes more and more complex by the differentiation of its parts; a continuous and progressive change according to certain laws and by means of resident forces.
convergent evolution the development, in animals that are only distantly related, of similar structures or functions in adaptation to similar environments.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

the evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wing-like structures in insects, birds, and flying mammals.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

convergent evolution

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

con·ver·gent ev·o·lu·tion

(kŏn-vĕr'jĕnt ev'ŏ-lū'shŭn)
The evolutionary development of similar structures in two or more species, often widely separated phylogenetically, in response to similarities of environment; for example, the wings in insects, birds, and flying mammals.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

convergent evolution

1. The process in which phylogenetically distinct lineages acquire similar characteristics.
2. Evolutionary changes in which descendants resemble each other more closely than their progenitors did.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

convergence

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convergent evolution

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parallelism

a form of evolution which results in unrelated organisms independently producing similarities of form, usually because they become adapted to living in similar types of environment. For example, fish and cetaceans have evolved similar streamlined body shapes and fins.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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