covalent bond

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Related to Covalent bonds: Covalent Compounds, Polar covalent bonds

bond

 [bond]
the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, represented by a pair of dots or a line between atoms, e.g., H—O—H, H—C≡C—H or H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.
coordinate covalent bond a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond), or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond a strong covalent bond, —S—S—, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
hydrogen bond a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond the —CO—NH— linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.

covalent bond

a chemical bond that forms by the sharing of two electrons between atoms. A double bond is formed when four electrons are shared between two atoms; a triple bond is formed when six electrons are shared between two atoms.

covalent bond (kō·vāˑ·lnt bnd),

n chemical bond that involves sharing of electrons between atoms of the same element to give a molecule of that element (e.g., nitrogen) or atoms of two or more elements to give a molecule of a compound (e.g., carbon dioxide); the predominant type of bonding in organic chemistry.

bond

the linkage between atoms or radicals of a chemical compound, or the symbol representing this linkage and indicating the number and attachment of the valencies of an atom in constitutional formulas, e.g. H−O−H, H−C= C−H and can be represented by a pair of dots between atoms, e.g. H:O:H, H:C:::C:H.

coordinate covalent bond
a covalent bond in which one of the bonded atoms furnishes both of the shared electrons.
covalent bond
a chemical bond between two atoms or radicals formed by the sharing of a pair (single bond), two pairs (double bond) or three pairs of electrons (triple bond).
disulfide bond
a strong covalent bond, −S−S−, important in linking polypeptide chains in proteins, the linkage arising as a result of the oxidation of the sulfhydryl (SH) groups of two molecules of cysteine.
high-energy phosphate bond
an energy-rich phosphate linkage present in adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine and certain other biological molecules. On hydrolysis at pH 7 it yields about 8000 calories per mole, in contrast to the 3000 calories yielded by phosphate esters. The bond stores energy that is used to drive biochemical processes, such as the synthesis of macromolecules, contraction of muscles, and the production of the electrical potentials for nerve conduction.
high-energy sulfur bond
an energy-rich sulfur linkage, the most important of which occurs in the acetyl-CoA molecule, the main source of energy in fatty acid biosynthesis.
human-animal bond
the psychological interdependence between humans and companion animals.
hydrogen bond
a weak, primarily electrostatic, bond between a hydrogen atom bound to a highly electronegative element (such as oxygen or nitrogen) in a given molecule, or part of a molecule, and a second highly electronegative atom in another molecule or in a different part of the same molecule.
ionic bond
a chemical bond in which electrons are transferred from one atom to another so that one bears a positive and the other a negative charge, the attraction between these opposite charges forming the bond.
peptide bond
the −CO−NH− linkage formed between the carboxyl group of one amino acid and the amino group of another; it is an amide linkage joining amino acids to form peptides.
phosphoanhydride bond
a high energy bond present in ATP.
phosphodiester bond
links between nucleotides in nucleic acids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The eight double bonds in the V-POSS or MPOSS molecule structure showed the reactivity with MMA to form the cross-linking structure in covalent bonds (Fig.
Since van der Waals interactions are non-bonded, in comparison with covalent bonds between atoms, van der Waals interactions are very weak.
To illustrate covalent bond formation based on the magnetic interaction, we examine the covalent bonds in hydrogen gas (like atoms) and hydrogen chloride (unlike atoms).
Thus the millions of compounds necessary for life will have a skeleton of carbon atoms, each with four, not two, not three, not five, nor six, covalent bonds.
by use of standard phosphoramidite chemistry (15,16), with a brominated deoxyuridine substituted for the thymidine (T) usually found in DNA; these photoactive residues participate in covalent bond formation.
During the recent installation and acceptance test phase our new EVG580 ComBond has demonstrated its capacity to create excellent covalent bonds at room temperature.
Silane coupling agents are known to promote bonding between two incompatible surfaces by forming covalent bonds.
Among the general topics are polar covalent bonds in acids and bases, stereochemistry at tetrahedral centers, the structure and reactivity of alkenes, organohalides, determining structure with mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy, benzene and aromaticity, and alcohols and phenols.
The key to the unique behaviour of cyclopentadienyl lies in its pentagonal (five-fold) symmetry, which prevents it latching onto any one site within the triangular (three-fold) symmetry of the copper surface through directional covalent bonds, leaving it free to move easily from site to site," Dr Marco Sacchi, of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Cambridge, who carried out the calculations that helped explain the startling new experimental results, said.
Jeff Motley, R&D manager for Bayer's Medical Coatings Development Centre, explains, "The chemistry of the process ensures that wherever there is coating present, it is very strongly adhered by covalent bonds.
Coordination chemistry is named after the coordination compounds, or complexes, it studies, which are named after the coordinate or dative covalent bonds they contain, which differ from garden variety covalent bonds mainly in how chemists envisage they are formed.
Warner, the traditional construction of materials is usually driven by classical synthetic transformations involving the making and breaking of covalent bonds.