case law

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Related to Court decision: Court ruling

com·mon law

(kom'ŏn law)
A system of law based on custom, tradition, and court decisions rather than on written legislation.

case law

Opinions or decisions made by the courts.
See also: law
References in periodicals archive ?
Higher-court rulings do not, of course, necessarily reflect the broader themes that might emerge from a discussion of people's court (narodnyi sud) or district (kraevoi) and regional (oblastnoi) appellate court decisions.
In reversing both lower court decisions, the Supreme Court ruled that the government could use, in combination, the criminal law to prosecute someone and the civil forfeiture laws to confiscate that person's property, even where both actions were based upon the same underlying criminal offense.
The impact of the decision still rests on future court decisions.
We are hopeful the appeals court overturns this disturbing lower court decision and puts the power to protect Americans back in the hands of the President.
The decision overturned a New York County Supreme Court decision.
Both of the cases were appeals from Tax Court decisions.
Because the invocation of Miranda rights, particularly the right to counsel, has such an onerous impact on law enforcement's ability to conduct interrogations, recent court decisions have begun to impose some limitations on a custodial suspect's ability to invoke that right.
NYSE:STA) announced that the outcome of today's court decision by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, upholding the jury verdict regarding the World Trade Center, will not result in an earnings charge as the impact of the lower court's decision had already been recognized in the company's financial statements.
Supreme Court decision upholding an outdoor Ten Commandments plaque in Texas, one Los Angeles County supervisor has asked lawyers to reconsider their opinion that the original 1957 county seal was unconstitutional.
Emboldened by a recent United States Supreme Court decision, conservatives are asking judges to hold unconstitutional the scope of the federal government's regulation of wetlands and water bodies since the Carter Administration (including during the administrations of Presidents Reagan and George H.
Writing in the September/October American Spectator, Jeremy Rabkin, a professor of government at Cornell, highlighted a constitutional "iceberg" lurking in a footnote to a recent Supreme Court decision.
Wells Fargo is significant because it represents the second favorable appellate court decision in recent months dealing with the capitalization of expenditures that have historically been treated as deductible.