countertransference

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countertransference

 [kown″ter-trans-fer´ens]
a transference reaction of a psychoanalyst or other psychotherapist to a patient; that is, an emotional reaction that is generally a reflection of the therapist's own inner needs and conflicts but also may be a reaction to the client's behavior.

count·er·trans·fer·ence

(kown'ter-trans-fer'ents),
In psychoanalysis, the analyst's transference (often unconscious) to the patient of emotional needs and conflicts from the analyst's past experiences or the analyst's current emotional responses to the manifestation of the patient's transference.

countertransference

/coun·ter·trans·fer·ence/ (koun″ter-trans-fer´ens) a transference reaction of a psychoanalyst or other psychotherapist to a patient.

countertransference

(koun′tər-trăns-fûr′əns, -trăns′fər-)
n.
Psychological transference by a psychotherapist in reaction to the emotions, experiences, or problems of a patient undergoing treatment.

countertransference

[-transfur′əns]
the conscious or unconscious emotional response of a psychotherapist or psychoanalyst to a patient. The response may be positive or negative but can provide useful data in the therapy.

count·er·trans·fer·ence

(kown'tĕr-trans-fĕr'ĕns)
psychoanalysis The analyst's transference (often unconscious) toward the patient of the analyst's emotional needs and feelings, with personal involvement to the detriment of the desired objective analyst-patient relationship.
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References in periodicals archive ?
disclosure of sexual feelings by the analyst is fundamentally different from disclosure of other counter-transference affects.
The case centred on issues of childhood abuse where a clear depiction of sadistic counter-transference and transference between the analyst and patient became evident.
Questions around how therapists negotiate counter-transference, in particular, offer a framework for considering what the spectator brings to encounters with traumatic representations and whether or not something beyond vicarious trauma can be cultivated on these occasions.
It gives an excellent account of the development of concepts of transference and counter-transference, and although some of this may not be easily accessible to readers not trained in the psychoanalytic tradition, it gives useful background to terms which are only too often used casually and imprecisely.
Sometimes, such resistance is part of the director's counter-transference.
This might be a useful text for those who study literature and want to become more sensitive to factors of transference and counter-transference.
Other authors also remind us of the issue of transference, counter-transference and parallel processes that may occur in supervision and how addressing and working through these phenomena may assist and transform the supervisory process (chapter 3 by Pedersen and chapter 9 by Davies & Sloboda).
She also examines special problems clinicians face when treating eating disordered patients, such as sexuality, transference and counter-transference, boundary issues, and medical and psychiatric comorbidities.
and his colleagues found poor outcomes for patients with alexithymia, and they attributed those outcomes to significant counter-transference reactions on the part of the therapist.
Chapter topics include: psychoanalytic observation, working with parents, developmental considerations, the role and challenges of play, transference and counter-transference, and a penultimate chapter on working with adolescents.
He develops an inquiry method that is both intersubjective and empathetic, creating a set of practical psychoanalytical methods based on empathy, defense, splitting, the unconscious, trauma, the myth of the isolated mind, transference and counter-transference, and affect.