countertransference

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countertransference

 [kown″ter-trans-fer´ens]
a transference reaction of a psychoanalyst or other psychotherapist to a patient; that is, an emotional reaction that is generally a reflection of the therapist's own inner needs and conflicts but also may be a reaction to the client's behavior.

count·er·trans·fer·ence

(kown'ter-trans-fer'ents),
In psychoanalysis, the analyst's transference (often unconscious) to the patient of emotional needs and conflicts from the analyst's past experiences or the analyst's current emotional responses to the manifestation of the patient's transference.

countertransference

/coun·ter·trans·fer·ence/ (koun″ter-trans-fer´ens) a transference reaction of a psychoanalyst or other psychotherapist to a patient.

countertransference

(koun′tər-trăns-fûr′əns, -trăns′fər-)
n.
Psychological transference by a psychotherapist in reaction to the emotions, experiences, or problems of a patient undergoing treatment.

countertransference

[-transfur′əns]
the conscious or unconscious emotional response of a psychotherapist or psychoanalyst to a patient. The response may be positive or negative but can provide useful data in the therapy.

count·er·trans·fer·ence

(kown'tĕr-trans-fĕr'ĕns)
psychoanalysis The analyst's transference (often unconscious) toward the patient of the analyst's emotional needs and feelings, with personal involvement to the detriment of the desired objective analyst-patient relationship.
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References in periodicals archive ?
disclosure of sexual feelings by the analyst is fundamentally different from disclosure of other counter-transference affects.
The case centred on issues of childhood abuse where a clear depiction of sadistic counter-transference and transference between the analyst and patient became evident.
1974, Counter-transference hate in the treatment of suicidal patients, Archives of General Psychiatry, 30, 625-633.
In other words, analysts are encouraged to pay attention to how their own wounds, vulnerabilities, and desires may be triggered by their analysands' transference of particular feelings onto them in the analytic encounter, since how they subsequently negotiate this counter-transference can either hinder or assist their ability to think about the analysands' circumstances and needs.
Counter-transference is similar to transference, except it happens to the therapist rather than the patient.
The second is looking for counter-transference in the traditional sense of examining the helper's own vulnerabilities and baggage, and this is followed by an initial pastoral assessment of the other's needs.
However, it may well be that Lipset's future publications will dwell on the dynamics of the Murik un/conscious actualities with a more acute sense of his counter-transference, a dimension that, if it were uncompromisingly attended to and worked through, might have turned his present construction of their dialogics into a more authentic ethnographic and personal self-synthesis.
The special systemic dimensions section addresses topics such as gender issues, loyalty in the family system, problems with intimacy, and counter-transference.
But when we realize, as Freud recognized, that transference is a universal phenomenon, the idea of institutional counter-transference becomes intelligible.
Support officers, however, must be strongly cautioned on the issue of counter-transference.
It draws both on material generated by the patient and on the analyst's understanding of the transference and counter-transference flowing between them.