countertransference

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countertransference

 [kown″ter-trans-fer´ens]
a transference reaction of a psychoanalyst or other psychotherapist to a patient; that is, an emotional reaction that is generally a reflection of the therapist's own inner needs and conflicts but also may be a reaction to the client's behavior.

count·er·trans·fer·ence

(kown'ter-trans-fer'ents),
In psychoanalysis, the analyst's transference (often unconscious) to the patient of emotional needs and conflicts from the analyst's past experiences or the analyst's current emotional responses to the manifestation of the patient's transference.

countertransference

(koun′tər-trăns-fûr′əns, -trăns′fər-)
n.
Psychological transference by a psychotherapist in reaction to the emotions, experiences, or problems of a patient undergoing treatment.

count·er·trans·fer·ence

(kown'tĕr-trans-fĕr'ĕns)
psychoanalysis The analyst's transference (often unconscious) toward the patient of the analyst's emotional needs and feelings, with personal involvement to the detriment of the desired objective analyst-patient relationship.
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References in periodicals archive ?
disclosure of sexual feelings by the analyst is fundamentally different from disclosure of other counter-transference affects.
Therefore, a clear depiction of how transference and counter-transference became enacted within the therapeutic arena was insightfully presented.
Counter-transference and Spectatorship: Searing to Look
Counter-transference considerations for the gay male when leading psychotherapy groups for gay men.
The relationships between addiction treatment providers and clients with severe mental illness, and the relationships between mental health service providers and those with severe alcohol and other drug problems, have been characterized by institutionalized counter-transference (e.g., lack of empathy, disrespect, contempt, exclusion, and extrusion).
Moreover, he argues compellingly that training programs that do not encourage trainees to become aware of their own counter-transference regarding spirituality and religion may hinder therapist development in this area.
In the first, she sets out the main points of her argument, and looks at understandings of transference and counter-transference in psychotherapy, pastoral care, and counselling.
counter-transference, that constitutes a key boundary between the
One wonders whether Satel is a victim of her own counter-transference when she refers to the mentally ill as "inmates" and psychiatric hospitals as "asylums," or rails against "the cult of the borderline." It would be unfortunate if Saters decided lack of empathy made the mentally ill more wary of organized psychiatry or fearful of the current generation of antipsychotic medications that have helped so many.