plantation

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plantation

(plăn-tā′shŭn) [L. plantare, to plant]
Insertion of a tooth into the bony socket from which it may have been removed by accident, or transplantation of a tooth into the socket from which a tooth has just been removed. The transplanted tooth may come from the patient or a donor.
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Kitt grew up on a deprived cotton plantation in a segregated South Carolina, but by the age of 20 had toured the world having started out with the Paris-based Katherine Dunham Dance.
Born: Eartha Mae Kitt in 1927 on a cotton plantation in South Carolina and was abandoned by her White father and Black mother
Thursday's report mentioned Jang as one of the officials accompanying Kim during inspections of production units, including a cotton plantation, run by the country's army.
Dixie Plantation is indeed unique, tracing its core origins to a 1830s cotton plantation once owned by the great-great grandson of President Thomas Jefferson.
She points out that the same formula that enabled western colonial expansion--foreign capital plus extractive agricultural industries plus coerced labor--gave rise in the Delta to a totalitarian regime controlled by a handful of wealthy hardwood and cotton plantation businessmen.
In other words, worry about what you look like, not what your clothing purchase is doing to the Earth, to cotton plantation workers, to exploited women and children in garment sweatshops.
Bush is a product of the Deep South tradition of the cotton plantation country, transplanted to the West Texas oil region.
Virgin Islands National Park protects several 18th century sugar and cotton plantation ruins, and those on the Maho Bay Estate are vitally important to preserving the island's history, said Doug Armstrong, a Syracuse University anthropology professor who has been working with the Park Service for several years.
Although it is true, as they emphasize, that southerners did retain considerable power in congressional committees through the end of the 1960s, their constituencies were changing and becoming more complicated, and they were by no means as responsive to cotton plantation owners as they had been earlier.
From Slavery to Agrarian Capitalism in the Cotton Plantation South would be an excellent monograph to use in a U.S.
Cotton plantation in Punjab wasn't as severely impacted by water shortage but could only be sown at 4.39 million acres or 77 percent of the targeted area set at 5.70 million acres.