symport

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symport

 [sim´port]
a transport mechanism that moves two compounds simultaneously across a cell membrane in the same direction, one compound being transported down a concentration gradient and the other against a gradient. See also antiport and cotransport.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·port

(sim'pōrt),
Coupled transport of two different molecules or ions through a membrane in the same direction by a common carrier mechanism (symporter). Compare: antiport, uniport.
[sym- + L. porto, to carry]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sym·port

(sim'pōrt)
Coupled transport of two different molecules or ions through a membrane in the same direction by a common carrier mechanism (symporter).
Compare: antiport, uniport
[sym- + L. porto, to carry]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
'Use of sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors and risk of major cardiovascular events and heart failure: Scandinavian register based cohort study'
Other prescribed treatments after the initial diagnosis included sulfonylureas (7%), insulin (6%), dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (6%), sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors (1.5%) and a variety of combination treatments typically metformin plus sufonylureas (5%).
7, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sotagliflozin (SOTA), a dual sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 inhibitor (SGLT1i) and SGLT2i, is associated with short- and long-term renal hemodynamic changes in patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online Aug.
- Therapies in the pipeline for PCOS focus on targets such as AMP-activated protein kinase, neurokinin receptor, and sodium glucose cotransporter (SGLT).
Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors and risk of serious adverse events: nationwide register based cohort study.
NEW ORLEANS -- Patients who have type 2 diabetes and are taking a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor have lower risks of heart failure hospitalization and all-cause mortality than patients on other glucose-lowering drugs regardless of whether their baseline left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) is preserved or reduced, based on data from a large real-world patient registry.
Patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease show significantly lower incidence of kidney failure and cardiovascular events after treatment with the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor canagliflozin, in the CREDENCE trial.
Bp: Blood pressure; C: Canagliflozin; D: Dapagliflozin; Em: Empagliflozin; HbA1c: Glycosylated hemoglobin; NR: Not reported; OD: Once daily; P: Placebo; S: SGLT-2: Sodium-glucose cotransporter
Agents that selectively block sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2), located in the proximal tubule of the kidney inhibit glucose absorption, induce its elimination and lowers blood glucose independently of insulin.8,9 In this study we evaluated the safety and efficiency of the dapagliflozin on the patients using high dose insulin.
Consider adding a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor or a glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) agonist to the treatment regimen of patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes--especially those with higher CV risk.