Cotard delusion

(redirected from Cotard's Syndrome)
A rare delusional disorder linked to depression, suicidal ideation, sleep deprivation or derealisation, in which a person believes he/she is dead or dying, doesn’t exist, is putrefying, or has lost his/her blood or internal organs
Management Tricyclic antidepressants, serotoninergics
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Cotard delusion

[J. Cotard, Fr. neurologist, b. 1840 d. 1889]
Delirium of negation.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
He was diagnosed with Cotard's syndrome - also known as walking corpse syndrome - and believed he was dead.
Purdy, "Dysmetropsia and Cotard's syndrome due to migrainous infarction--or not?" Cephalalgia, vol.
The significance of signifiers to Kaufman is apparent within the film itself, even just in Caden's surname--Cotard, a presumable reference to Cotard's syndrome, a mental illness that causes individuals to believe they are the walking dead.
Cotard's syndrome is a rare psychiatric disorder in which the afflicted patient believes he or she is dead.
Cotard's Syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical event, characterized by negation delusion (or nihilist), generally regarding the body (frequently the patient believes that he or she does not have one or more organs) or regarding the existence (the individual judges that himself or everybody in the world is dead or reduced to nothing, being able to judge himself a zombie), but also concerning concepts/conditions [1] (such as a CS case described in which a woman was sure about not being pregnant, despite of obvious evidences [2]).
A motorcycle accident has left him with Cotard's syndrome, a mental illness which causes him to believe he is dead--nothing more than an amoral empty "Shell".
She has Cotard's syndrome, a psychotic illness, and spent years in mental institutions during her formative years.
A few lines from William Wordsworth's 1807 poem "She Was a Phantom of Delight" came to me: "And now I see with eye serene/The very pulse of the machine;/ A Being breathing thoughtful breath,/ A traveller betwixt life and death." Poised between insanity and the afterlife, Symphony is ever more intriguing when one considers the neuropsychiatric disorder known as Cotard's syndrome, of which the symptoms are general feelings of unreality, bodilessness, nonexistence: a fit description of the work.
Biological basis and staging of Cotard's syndrome. Eur Psychiatry.
Diurnal variation in Cotard's Syndrome (copresent with Capgras delusion) following traumatic brain injury.
It was his first novel featuring DC Fiona Griffiths, a Cardiff policewoman with an unusual back-story: found abandoned as a young child, she developed Cotard's syndrome, a mental condition that caused her to be institutionalised in her teens and which left her unable to gauge the emotions of others.