Cotard delusion

(redirected from Cotard's Syndrome)
A rare delusional disorder linked to depression, suicidal ideation, sleep deprivation or derealisation, in which a person believes he/she is dead or dying, doesn’t exist, is putrefying, or has lost his/her blood or internal organs
Management Tricyclic antidepressants, serotoninergics

Cotard delusion

[J. Cotard, Fr. neurologist, b. 1840 d. 1889]
Delirium of negation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cotard's syndrome is characterized by the appearance of nihilistic delusions concerning one's own body or life.
Keywords: Neuroleptic malignant syndrome, Cotard's syndrome, atypical neuroleptic malignant syndrome, nihilistic delusions, electro-convulsive therapy
The significance of signifiers to Kaufman is apparent within the film itself, even just in Caden's surname--Cotard, a presumable reference to Cotard's syndrome, a mental illness that causes individuals to believe they are the walking dead.
Cotard's Syndrome (CS) is a rare clinical event, characterized by negation delusion (or nihilist), generally regarding the body (frequently the patient believes that he or she does not have one or more organs) or regarding the existence (the individual judges that himself or everybody in the world is dead or reduced to nothing, being able to judge himself a zombie), but also concerning concepts/conditions [1] (such as a CS case described in which a woman was sure about not being pregnant, despite of obvious evidences [2]).
A motorcycle accident has left him with Cotard's syndrome, a mental illness which causes him to believe he is dead--nothing more than an amoral empty "Shell".
She has Cotard's syndrome, a psychotic illness, and spent years in mental institutions during her formative years.
Cotard's syndrome patients may even declare they are dead, yet they can still think--a case of cogito without ergo sum?
Cotard's syndrome and delayed diagnosis in Kashmir, India.
Cotard's syndrome in adolescents and young adults: a possible onset of Bipolar disorder requiring a mood stabilizer?
It was his first novel featuring DC Fiona Griffiths, a Cardiff policewoman with an unusual back-story: found abandoned as a young child, she developed Cotard's syndrome, a mental condition that caused her to be institutionalised in her teens and which left her unable to gauge the emotions of others.
psychotic constellations of Capgras or Cotard's syndromes.