Cotard

Co·tard

(kō-tahr'),
Jules, French neurologist, 1840-1887. See: Cotard syndrome.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These are "Kabilin" by Roy Robert Rusiana; "Cotard Syndrome" by MC Viluan Capadiso; "Champion" by Juan Carlo Balasbas Tarobal; "Lupi" by Dave Tolentino; "Pitaka" by Mark Jason Sucgang; "May Love Life Na Si Pepito Jr." by James Edward Golla; and "Walang Hanggang Ligaya Sa Una Mong Ngiti" by Dylan Ray Talon.
He was diagnosed with Cotard's syndrome - also known as walking corpse syndrome - and believed he was dead.
Furthermore, Cotard syndrome comprises a delusion in which the subject believes he is dead or does not exist; a denial of self-existence within a severe melancholic depression.
Neurologists and other researchers from Europe and the US discuss Ganser syndrome; Cotard syndrome; Capgras syndrome and other delusional misidentification syndromes; De Clerambault syndrome, Othello syndrome, Folie C deux, and variants; Couvade syndrome; possessions; conversion, factitious disorder, and malingering; Munchausen syndrome; camptocormia; glossolalia and aphasia; violent behavior; culture-specific hyperstartle-plus syndromes; the dancing manias or mass psychogenic illness; and the Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome.
De manera infrecuente, se han descrito casos de delirios erotomaniacos, delirio de parasitosis, sindromes de Cotard y alucinaciones auditivas (54).
In fact, the melancholy individual often considers himself as a living dead, this experience being present in the first level of the Cotard syndrome.
Pfuhlmann, "Delusional paralysis: An unusual variant of Cotard's syndrome," Psychopathology, vol.
Some specific forms of delusions such as the Cotard syndrome (implying nihilistic delusions, hypochondriacal delusions, and delusions of immortality) [10-12], Capgras syndrome (including having the conviction that a family member or friend has been replaced by another), and Othello syndrome (being described as a delusional jealousy) have further been named [13,14], the latter showing an association with dopamine agonist therapy and an improvement after its reduction.
In a patient experiencing both dysmetropsia and Cotard's syndrome, a large cortical grey matter hyperintensity in T2 in the right temporal-parietal-occipital lobe with gyriform gadolinium enhancement on T1 was found in the acute phase and disappeared with the resolution of symptoms [20].
The central character of Synecdoche, Caden Cotard (Philip Seymour Hoffman), is a theater director who wants to create a play that will fully represent the truth of his own life.