CUA

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CUA

Abbreviation for:
chronic urticaria and angiooedema
cost-utility analysis (Medspeak-UK)
References in periodicals archive ?
A cost-utility analysis of degarelix in the treatment of advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer in the United Kingdom.
There are limited studies that include cost-utility analysis in examination of cost effectiveness of programs that include home visits for frail older adults.
Colin, "Management for severe Crohn's disease: A lifetime cost-utility analysis," International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care, vol.
1 indicate, the most common economic method used in the economic evaluation of the medical device development is the cost-utility analysis (cf.
The results showed that among the 27 reviewed articles, 1 article performed the cost-benefit analysis (32) and the number of articles in connection with the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis were 17 and 9, respectively.
In order to perform a cost-utility analysis, an analytical Markov model was created in which one hypothetical cohort of Puerto Rican patients were treated with warfarin in order to predict the direct medical care cost of the treatment (e.g.
The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-utility analysis of existing drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B in the context of the Brazilian public health system.
(4) Cost-utility analysis (CUA) is an established method for assessing "value for money" of a health care intervention using an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER)--dividing the costs incurred by the additional quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained.
A separate cost-utility analysis published earlier this month showed that dutasteride at a cost of $626 per year, down from the current cost of $1,400, was unlikely to be cost effective for chemoprevention use in men at elevated risk for prostate cancer (Cancer Prev.
comparing alternative treatments in the context of costs and outcomes (reduced mortality, reduced morbidity) of the disease (cost-utility analysis);
While it can be used to measure health-related quality of life alone, its main purpose is to measure the 'utility' of health states (that is, the preferences people have for different health states) in a way suitable for use in economic evaluation studies, in particular, cost-utility analysis.
A cost-utility analysis uses the best information available to estimate the likelihood of all the possible outcomes and the financial costs and health consequences of each of these outcomes.