cost-benefit ratio


Also found in: Financial.

cost-benefit ratio

a mathematic representation of the relationship of the cost of an activity to the benefit of its outcome or product.
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Village trustees agreed at a recent committee session that a specific cost-benefit ratio should be tracked this year.
He said a production survey should be contacted in the member countries to find out the exact production pattern of commodities and products produced, technologies used for the purpose, various inputs applied, costs and finally the cost-benefit ratio.
Before specifying expensive tool alloys with higher thermal conductivity, it is important to have a clear understanding of their cost-benefit ratio.
Explanations / This discussion largely illustrates that improvements in net benefits don't equate to a more favorable cost-benefit ratio.
Interventions targeting specifically the common conditions are likely to have a better cost-benefit ratio.
Clinical protocols could be established by which just those drugs with the best cost-benefit ratio would be reimbursed as the first step in treatment, and reimbursement for other drugs with less favorable cost-benefit ratios would only occur upon failure or intolerance of first-choice ones.
All treatments were applied each week for six weeks and compared by measuring damaged fruits and shoots, yield and cost-benefit ratio in a controlled, replicated field experiment on Diksha cultivar of okra.
The cost-benefit ratio of this measure varies tremendously in terms of the findings of different studies, some of which even call into question the added value of such a proposal.
Table 4: Economics and cost-benefit ratio of different rice based cropping systems
The No argument is often dressed up as concern about HS2's value for money or its cost-benefit ratio, when in fact it's primarily about the geographical inconvenience that it brings for a vocal but relatively small minority.
For the rapporteur, the one-year extension of the existing agreement under the terms proposed by the Commission is "unacceptable" because of its low cost-benefit ratio for the EU, the excessive exploitation of demersal stocks, the very limited contribution of EU funds to the development of local fisheries policy and the lack of proof that the EU funds will benefit the local population of Western Sahara.
lc] is more expensive than fasting glucose, so the cost-benefit ratio must be determined.