cost-benefit analysis

(redirected from Cost-benefit)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Cost-benefit: Cost-benefit ratio

cost-benefit analysis

Cost-benefit evaluation Clinical trials A form of economic analysis from a social perspective, in which the costs of medical care are compared with the economic benefits of the care provided, with both the costs and benefits being expressed in monetary units; the benefits evaluated include projected ↓ in future health care costs and ↑ earning as a result of the intervention of interest. Cf Cost-effectiveness analysis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(97.) EPA's decision to style the cost-benefit option a "compliance alternative" rather than a "variance" does not make the provisions of the Clean Water Act dealing with exceptions to technology-based standards--there styled "variances"--any less relevant.
To prevent such things happening in future, there is a need for legal provisions to ensure that no project is undertaken without a proper cost-benefit analysis by independent subject specialists.
From 2009 to 2012, Sunstein headed the Obama administration's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA), the part of the executive branch that enforces the requirement for cost-benefit analysis of major government regulations.
In a new book, The Cost-Benefit Revolution, the American legal scholar Cass Sunstein applauds the gradual expansion of reliance on cost-benefit analyses to guide regulatory policy in the United States since the 1980s.
Caption: Scott Pruitt signs the Advance Notice, likely leading to a review of the cost-benefit factors the Agency has used to craft new regulations on emissions from vehicles and industrial sources.
This research used SP, NPV, NPVR, and IRR to study the cost-benefit of CSP in China.
[4] proposed a composite decision support based on combining cost-benefit analysis with multi-criteria decision analysis for the assessment of economic as well as strategic impacts within transport projects.
"We knew that Washington state was shaking things up and that more states could benefit from applying a cost-benefit analysis to their programs," says Pew's Gary VanLandingham.
In 1981, President Reagan mandated by Executive Order that all administrative agencies perform cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of all "economically significant" regulations that they issue.
The majority sided with industry supporters, who cited a single phrase in the 45-year-old Clean Air Act - that the agency can regulate pollutants only when "appropriate and necessary." By their logic, no regulation can be justified without a cost-benefit analysis.
One of the reasons OIRA was so successful in spurring the development of analytic capacity at the EPA and other executive agencies is that it collaborated with the agencies in both developing cost-benefit methodology and in incorporating the outputs of CBA into agencies' proposed rules.
On the first question, industry groups--principally trade associations representing polluters--favored the use of cost-benefit analysis, arguing that environmental benefits needed to be weighed against the resulting undesirable economic consequences.

Full browser ?