Corynebacterium


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Corynebacterium

 [ko-ri″ne-bak-tēr´e-um]
a genus of gram-positive, nonmotile, straight to slightly curved rod-shaped bacteria. It includes both pathogenic and nonpathogenic organisms, which are widely distributed in nature. Species include C. ac´nes, found in acne lesions; C. diphthe´riae, the etiologic agent of diphtheria; C. haemoly´ticum, found in pharyngitis and skin ulcers; C. minutis´simum, the causative agent of erythrasma; C. pseudodiphtheri´ticum, a nonpathogenic inhabitant of the upper respiratory tract; C. te´nuis, the causative agent of trichomycosis axillaris; C. ul´cerans, which causes nasopharyngeal infections; and C. xero´sis, an opportunistic pathogen found on the skin and mucous membranes and in the conjunctival sac.

Corynebacterium

(kŏ-rī'nē-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm),
A genus of nonmotile (except for some plant pathogens), aerobic to anaerobic bacteria (family Corynebacteriaceae) containing irregularly staining, gram-positive, straight to slightly curved, often club-shaped rods that, as a result of snapping division, may show a picket fence arrangement. These organisms are widely distributed in nature. The best known species are parasites and pathogens of humans and domestic animals. The type species is Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
[G. coryne, a club, + bacterium, a small rod]

cor·y·ne·bac·te·ri·um

, pl.

cor·y·ne·bac·te·ri·a

(kŏ-rī'nē-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm, -ă),
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Corynebacterium.

corynebacterium

(kôr′ə-nē-băk-tîr′ē-əm, kə-rĭn′ə-)
n. pl. corynebac·teria (-tîr′ē-ə)
Any of various gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Corynebacterium, which includes many animal and plant pathogens, such as the causative agent of diphtheria.

Corynebacterium

A genus of small, nonmotile, gram-positive bacteria which come in a number of shapes from straight and curved rods to club shapes; most are facultative anaerobes with some similarities to mycobacteria and nocardiae

Cor·y·ne·bac·te·ri·um

(kŏ-rī'nē-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
A genus of nonmotile (except for some plant pathogens), aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Corynebacteriaceae) containing irregularly staining, gram-positive, straight to slightly curved, often club-shaped rods that, as a result of snapping division, show a picket fence arrangement. These organisms are widely distributed in nature. The best known species are parasites and pathogens of humans and domestic animals. The type species is C. diphtheriae.
[G. korynē, a club, + bacterium, a small rod]

cor·y·ne·bac·te·ri·um

, pl. corynebacteria (kŏ-rī'nē-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm, -ă)
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus Corynebacterium.

Corynebacterium

Any species of the genus Corynebacterium . These are GRAM POSITIVE rod-shaped bacteria and include the organism that causes diphtheria, Corynebacterium diphtheriae .

Cor·y·ne·bac·te·ri·um

(kŏ-rī'nē-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm)
Genus of widely distributed aerobic to anaerobic bacteria containing irregularly staining, gram-positive, straight to slightly curved, often club-shaped rods; pathogenic in humans.
[G. coryne, a club, + bacterium, a small rod]
References in periodicals archive ?
Five of the 46 bacteria isolated from cassava-fermentation related sites and appliances secreted methionine, namely Lactobacillus plantarum, Leuconostoc sp., Corynebacterium sp.
Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains isolated from patients in Belarus during an epidemic period.
Unusual Corynebacterium mucifaciens isolated from ear and nasal specimens.
The culture of the suprapubic aspirate confirmed these results although in one case there was growth of coagulase-negative staphylococci and Corynebacterium spp.
Corynebacterium diphtheriae skin infections in Alabama and Louisiana.
Out of these, the ones from Corynebacterium kutsceri (6a), Streptococcus mitis (6b) gave displacements of 30 and 60 mm which are considerable with 35 mm displacement given by the SDS control.
Toxigenic strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae are transmitted person-to-person and cause respiratory and cutaneous diphtheria; infections of other mucous membranes, such as the eye, have been reported (1).
Especially, Corynebacterium species, a component of the normal dermal flora, are suspected of being involved in the etiology and have been isolated in some cases (7, 9).
The DOH said diphtheria is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

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