corrosion

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cor·ro·sion

(kŏ-rō'zhŭn),
1. Gradual deterioration or consummation of a substance by another, especially by biochemical or chemical reaction. Compare: erosion.
2. The product of corroding, such as rust.
[L. cor-rodo (conr-), pp. -rosus, to gnaw]

corrosion

[kərō′zhen]
a result of an oxidation-reduction reaction, or deterioration of a substance by a destructive agent. See also corrosive.

cor·ro·sion

(kŏr-ō'zhŭn)
1. Gradual deterioration or consummation of a substance by another, especially by biochemical or chemical reaction.
2. That produced by corroding.
[L. cor-rodo (conr-), pp. -rosus, to gnaw]

corrosion,

n an electrolytic or chemical attack of a surface. Usually refers to the attack of a metal surface.
References in periodicals archive ?
Structural engineers indispensably need corrosivity data and composition of atmospheric pollutants of a location for curtailing down corrosion losses [8].
ISO 9225 Corrosion of metals and alloys corrosivity of atmosphere measurement of pollution.
2010) are reviewing the corrosion models and rates provided by the ISO standards aiming to provide new "basis for the classification of corrosivity according to the C1 to C5 categories".
Another factor in crude oil corrosivity is sulfur content.
Having compared data on corrosivity of solutions, obtained after a longer exposure time in the study solutions, it is obvious that corrosivity of sodium chloride solution with calcium chloride agent is higher compared to corrosivity of sodium chloride solution (Fig.
For best results and to reduce the corrosivity of the chemical splashing on stuff on the way down the hole, dilute the bleach 50/50 with water.
When discarded, spent wipers are considered hazardous waste if they exhibit certain characteristics (ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity or toxicity) or if they contain solvents identified as hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).
Acknowledging that plumbing components, alternative water treatment methods, and natural water corrosivity can contribute to lead contamination in tap water is a good first step in the effort to protect children from this source of lead exposure, but where do we go from here?
Corrosivity of atmospheres classification, International Organization for Standardization, Geneva.
The corrosivity of the atmosphere can vary significantly depending on climate, level of pollution, and distance to the sea.
Besides mechanical hardware reliability issues, the reliability impact of dust also has a chemical component: thes corrosivity of the dust particles.