corpora amylacea


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corpus

 [kor´pus] (pl. cor´pora) (L.)
body.
corpus al´bicans white fibrous tissue that replaces the regressing corpus luteum in the human ovary in the latter half of pregnancy, or soon after ovulation when pregnancy does not supervene.
corpus amygdaloi´deum amygdaloid body.
cor´pora amyla´cea small hyaline masses of degenerate cells found in the prostate, neuroglia, and other sites.
corpus callo´sum an arched mass of white matter in the depths of the longitudinal fissure, made up of transverse fibers connecting the cerebral hemispheres.
corpus caverno´sum either of the two columns of erectile tissue forming the body of the penis or clitoris.
corpus fimbria´tum a band of white matter bordering the lateral edge of the lower cornu of the lateral ventricle of the brain.
corpus genicula´tum see geniculate bodies, lateral, and geniculate bodies, medial.
corpus hemorrha´gicum
1. an ovarian follicle containing blood.
2. a corpus luteum containing a blood clot.
3. a blood clot formed in the cavity left by rupture of a graafian follicle.
corpus lu´teum a yellow glandular mass in the ovary formed by an ovarian follicle that has matured and discharged its ovum; see also ovulation.
corpus mammilla´re mamillary body.
cor´pora quadrige´mina four rounded eminences on the posterior surface of the mesencephalon.
corpus spongio´sum pe´nis a column of erectile tissue forming the urethral surface of the penis, in which the urethra is found.
corpus ster´ni body of sternum.
corpus stria´tum a subcortical mass of gray matter and white matter in front of and lateral to the thalamus in each cerebral hemisphere.
corpus u´teri that part of the uterus above the isthmus and below the orifices of the fallopian tubes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

corpora amylacea

A term referring to ovoid, lamellated, and sharply-circumscribed pale-to-darkly eosinophilic starch granule-like structures, seen in the brain, prostate and lungs, which have no known clinical significance.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, in my study a 23-year-old specimen had shown corpora amylacea with no evidence of inflammation or hyperplasia indicating that it cannot be considered as a sign of involution- and this requires further confirmation by research.
Focal granulomatous inflammation is associated with epithelial disruption due to corpora amylacea. Dystrophic calcification is infrequent and usually appears in areas with the greatest reparative response.
A small focus of a neuropil-like structure with rare glial cells and corpora amylacea was located adjacent to the skeletal muscle (figure 2, C).