indolent ulcer

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in·do·lent ul·cer

a chronic ulcer, with hard elevated edges and few or no granulations, and showing no tendency to heal.

indolent ulcer

A nearly painless ulcer usually found on the leg, characterized by an indurated, elevated edge and a nongranulating base.
See also: ulcer
References in periodicals archive ?
Corneal ulcer is a non-specific term, and includes both non infectious and infectious keratitis cases, although more precise term such as microbial keratitis is gaining acceptance5.
Epidemiological characteristics, predisposing factors and microbiological profiles of infectious corneal ulcers: the Portsmouth corneal ulcer study.
Edelmann et al decided to see if platelet rich plasma (PRP) would help corneal ulcers heal faster.
Patients were divided into four groups according to cause of infection: posttraumatic, postsurgical, endogenous, and corneal ulcer with perforation.
It shows a round 4 x 4 mm corneal ulcer reaching the deep stroma, associated with massive melting surrounding the edema and perikeratic injection.
A 26-year-old, female hyacinth macaw (Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus) from the Oklahoma City Zoo (Oklahoma City, OK, USA) was presented for ophthalmologic examination after a 5-week history of a nonhealing corneal ulcer of the right eye.
Previously harvested and frozen amniotic graft was applied in different types of ocular surface disorders, such as corneal ulcers, pterygium, keratomalacia, Steven-Johnson syndrome, etc.
Caption: FIGURE 1: Left eye photo 6 weeks after initial presentation which shows peripheral corneal ulcer extended from 3 to 6:30 o'clock position with about 70-80% stromal thinning.
A clinical microbiological study of corneal ulcer patients at western Gujarat, India.
Dr Allamby added: "Research from Australia showed the chance each year of getting an infected corneal ulcer or abscess is one in 2,000.
(4) The occurrence of different leprosy-related eye complications in LL hansen's and Type II lepra reaction is about 44%, which includes ocular muscle weakness, lagophthalmos, ectropion, trichiasis, entropion, blocked nasolacrimal ducts, pterygium, impaired corneal sensation, corneal opacity, corneal nerve beading, punctate keratitis, iris atrophy, blindness, episcleritis, scleritis, iridocyclitis, iris atrophy and decreased visual acuity, corneal ulcer and cataract.
Keratitis (corneal ulcer) is an umbrella term for an inflammatory or infectious event that is characterized by redness, pain and sometimes decreased vision.