pannus

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Related to Corneal neovascularization: corneal vascularization

pannus

 [pan´us]
1. superficial vascularization of the cornea with infiltration of granulation tissue.
2. an inflammatory exudate overlying synovial cells on the inside of a joint capsule, usually occurring in rheumatoid arthritis or related articular rheumatism.
3. panniculus adiposus.
Schematic presentation of the pathologic changes in rheumatoid arthritis. The inflammation (synovitis) leads to pannus formation, obliteration of the articular space. From Damjanov, 2000.

pan·nus

, pl.

pan·ni

(pan'ŭs, pan'ī), A membrane of granulation tissue covering a normal surface:
1. The inflammatory synovial tissue found in rheumatoid joints that covers the articular cartilages that progressively destroys the underlying articular cartilages; also found in other chronic granulomatous disease, including tuberculosis.
See also: corneal pannus.
2. The cornea in trachoma.
See also: corneal pannus.
[L. cloth]

pannus

A reticulated membrane of granulation (reactive fibrovascular) tissue, which is typical of the chronic proliferodestructive phase of rheumatoid arthritis; immune complexes form at synovial membranes, evoking a nonspecific immune response by macrophages, resulting in global destruction of chondroosseous tissue.

pannus

Rheumatology A reticulated membrane of granulation–reactive fibrovascular tissue typical of the chronic proliferodestructive phase of rheumatoid arthritis; immune complexes form at synovial membranes, evoking a nonspecific response, resulting in global destruction of chondroosseous tissue

pan·nus

, pl. panni (pan'ŭs, -ī)
1. A membrane of granulation tissue covering a normal surface.
2. The articular cartilages in rheumatoid arthritis and in chronic granulomatous diseases such as tuberculosis.
3. The cornea in trachoma.
See also: corneal pannus
[L. cloth]

pannus

A membrane of fine blood vessels and fibrous tissue that spreads down over the cornea in TRACHOMA and other inflammatory corneal disorders causing loss of vision. A similar membrane can affect the inner linings of joints.

pannus 

Abnormal superficial vascularization of the cornea covering the upper half, or sometimes the entire cornea. It is characterized by a thick plexus of vessels. It is found in some cases of contact lens wear, mainly soft lenses. Pannus following contact lens wear is referred to as corneal vascularization. If induced by soft lenses, it can be reduced by changing to lenses of high oxygen transmissibility or ceasing contact lens wear. Deep corneal vascularization involving the stroma is usually the result of a disease process (e.g. interstitial keratitis, phlyctenular keratitis, severe long-standing trichiasis, trachoma).
References in periodicals archive ?
Jurkunas, "Limbal stem cell deficiency and corneal neovascularization," Seminars in Ophthalmology, vol.
EUA showed bilateral stromal corneal neovascularization, without epithelial defect (Figures 2(a)-2(b)).
This was in contrast to [H.sub.2] solution treated corneas, where the corneal transparency was renewed during five days after the injury and corneal neovascularization was highly suppressed until day 20.
* The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Corneal Neovascularization
The most important exam is ophthalmoscopy to characterize the iris or pupil anomalies, opacifications and corneal neovascularization, and presence of cataract or glaucoma.
The effect of topical bevacizumab on corneal neovascularization. Ophthalmology 2008; 115: e33-e38.
We used a quantitave method of assessing the corneal neovascularization on grafted cornea after keratoplasty by measuring the invasion area of neovessels.
The VEGF Trap may also have applications outside of cancer in areas where pathologic vessel growth can cause problems, such as diabetic retinopathy, psoriasis, and corneal neovascularization associated with transplants, infection, or trauma.
SPK, corneal erosion, persistent corneal epithelial defect (PED), corneal ulcer, corneal neovascularization, decreased corneal endothelial cells, and corneal stromal edema are the clinical findings associated with NK [3-5].
Stage Clinical findings 1 Corneal epithelial irregularity Gaule spots Superficial punctuate keratopathy Increase viscosity of tear mucus Decrease break-up time Superficial corneal neovascularization Stromal scarring Dellen II Persistent corneal epithelial defect with smooth and rolled epithelium edges Descemet's membrane folds Stroma swelling Anterior chamber inflammatory reaction ([+ or -]hypopyon) III Corneal ulcer Stromal melting Corneal perforation Table 3: Characteristics of the study group.
The immediate start of topical treatment of the alkali-injured eye with antioxidant H2-enriched irrigation solution and N-acetyl-L-cysteine [1] or with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) revealing antioxidant properties significantly suppressed intracorneal inflammation and corneal neovascularization [2].