corepressor

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Related to Corepressor (genetics): coactivator, aporepressor

corepressor

 [ko″re-pres´ser]
a small molecule that combines with a protein aporepressor molecule to form an active substance, which then binds to an operator gene and inhibits the synthesis of an enzyme.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·re·pres·sor

(kō'rē-pres'ŏr),
A molecule, usually a product of a specific metabolic pathway (for example, nuclear protein), which combines with and activates a repressor produced by a regulator gene. The activated repressor then attaches to an operator gene site and inhibits activity of the structural genes. This homeostatic mechanism negatively regulates enzyme production in repressible enzyme systems.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

corepressor

(kō′rĭ-prĕs′ər)
n.
A substance that combines with and activates a genetic repressor, thus preventing gene transcription and inhibiting protein synthesis.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

co·re·pres·sor

(kō'rĕ-pres'ŏr)
A molecule, usually a product of a specific metabolic pathway, which combines with and activates a repressor produced by a regulator gene. The repressor then attaches to an operator gene site and inhibits activity of the structural genes. This homeostatic mechanism regulates enzyme production in repressible enzyme systems.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

corepressor

a substance of low molecular weight which unites with an APOREPRESSOR and reduces the activity of particular structural genes (see OPERON MODEL).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005