reef

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reef

 [rēf]
an infolding or tuck of tissue, as a tuck made in plication.

reef

(rēf)
A fold or tuck, usually taken in redundant tissue.

reef

an infolding or tuck of tissue, as a tuck made in plication.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the team, the robots can "autonomously map" or survey coral reefs.
To come to these conclusions the researchers involved looked at 100 coral reefs around the world and measured the bleaching events between 1980 and 2016.
Healthy coral reefs support commercial and subsistence fisheries as well as jobs and businesses through tourism and recreation.
Recent research, including that done by the IAEA, shows that ocean acidification effects on fisheries, aquaculture and coral reefs are expanding, both in terms of geographical location and intensity.
This marks the beginning of a new era, a time when not only Mote scientists, but international and national visiting scientists, can come to this building and continue to revolutionize the way we restore coral reefs, here and around the world, in our lifetime," said Dr.
That this symbiotic relationship arose during a time of massive worldwide coral-reef expansion suggests that the interconnection of algae and coral is crucial for the health of coral reefs, which provide habitat for roughly one-fourth of all marine life.
If Duterte's pronouncements of an independent foreign policy hold any weight at all, he should deliver on his administration's promise to file a 'strong protest' against China's construction with specific reference to the continuing destruction of our coral reefs,' he said.
coral bleaching--a sickness that affects coral reefs
CORAL REEFS | ECOSYSTEMS | NATURAL WORLD | CONNECTIONS | LIVING THINGS | MODELS
Climate models suggest that most coral reefs may be seeing bleaching every other year by midcentury," Eakin adds.
Read the study from the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.
As CO, enters the ocean, a well-known series of chemical reactions takes place, and carbonate ions, the currency of coral reefs, begin to disappear.

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