copperhead

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copperhead

 [kop´er-hed]
Agkistrodon contortrix, a venomous pit viper of the United States that has a brown to copper-colored body with dark bands. Called also highland moccasin. See also snakebite.

cop·per·head

(kop'er-hed),
A U.S. poisonous snake of the genus Agkistrodon.

copperhead

/cop·per·head/ (-hed)
1. a venomous snake (a pit viper), Agkistrodon contortrix, of the United States, having a brown to copper-colored body with dark bands.
2. a very venomous elapid snake, Denisonia superba, of Australia, Tasmania, and the Solomon Islands.

copperhead

(kŏp′ər-hĕd′)
n.
1. A venomous snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) of the eastern and central United States and northern Mexico, having a tan body with reddish-brown crossbands.
2. Copperhead A Northerner who sympathized with the South during the Civil War.

copperhead

[kop′ərhed′]
Etymology: L, cuprum + ME, hed
a poisonous pit viper (Agkistrodon contortrix) found mainly in the southeastern United States. The reddish brown, darkly banded snake is responsible for nearly 40% of the snakebites in the United States. Few bites are fatal. Pain, swelling, fang marks, and a bruise are usually present. Immediate treatment includes keeping the victim quiet and immobilizing the bite area at the level of the heart while seeking medical attention. Antivenin is available but is rarely indicated. See also coral snake, cottonmouth, rattlesnake.
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Copperhead
References in periodicals archive ?
If children, elderly people, and others have a compromised immune system, they are likely to have strong reactions to the venom of copperhead snakes.
The notifier subsequently identified the snake as a Victorian copperhead (Austrelaps superbus) from comparative photographs of Australian species.
In partnership with Copperhead Charities, Valspar is also furthering its commitment to enhancing the quality of life in the communities it serves by ensuring that proceeds from the tournament benefit causes aligned to affordable housing and urban renewal.
The movie is based upon the late-19th-century work of Harold Frederic, who used real-life events he witnessed in upstate New York during the war in crafting his novel, The Copperhead.
Timber rattlesnakes have long been extinct in Worcester County, and copperheads are gone, too.
In terms of military ramifications, the work might benefit from a fuller and more compelling investigation of the seemingly inverse relationship between the increasing antiwar aspects of the Copperheads and 1864 voting patterns among the military.
Copperheads prefer woodland habitat and feed primarily on small mammals, not fish.
It turns out that the peculiarly American term for interracial marriage, "miscegenation," originated in an elaborate hoax by Copperheads designed to deny Lincoln the election in 1864.
The bacterial diversity in the venom and oral cavities of two subspecies of Copperheads, the Northern and Southern Copperheads was investigated.
The US Army used only 90 Copperheads in the Gulf War, presumably because most firings were conducted against area targets, and it was rarely possible to laser-designate point targets at short notice.
They call it Snake Road, a gravel lane through southern Illinois' Shawnee National Forest, where each spring and fall automobile traffic is prohibited to ensure the safe passage of timber rattlers, water moccasins, and copperheads.