Cooper's ligament

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Cooper's ligament

Cooper's ligament

(1) Pectineal ligament (of Cooper); ligamentum pectineale [NA]. 
(2) Cooper's ligaments, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
While aging, gravity, heredity, pregnancy, and weight loss all contribute to a loss of breast shape, the stretching of the Cooper's ligaments is the main reason that breasts droop.
In turn, this causes the breasts' main support system, the Cooper's ligaments, to be put under stress leading to over-stretching.
Repetitive stress over time, such as that caused by exercise, stretches the Cooper's ligaments and skin consequently reducing the support mechanisms of the breast, ultimately leading to sagging of the breast.
With the average 36C breast weighing between 200 grams (8oz) and 300 grams (12oz), this uncontrolled movement puts great strain on the breast's fragile support structure, which comprises only the outer skin and a connective tissue known as the Cooper's ligaments.
The researchers found the two results of this breast movement were pain and discomfort, which is temporary, and a stretching of the Cooper's ligament, which is permanent.
Top cleavologist Catherine Lee, from bra manufacturers Gossard, said: "The real problem for Posh will be later on when her Cooper's ligaments have stretched from not wearing correctly supporting bras or no bras at all.
Breasts are made up of mainly fat glands with no muscle, with the finger-like Cooper's ligaments, which project horizontally from the breast wall, being the only natural support.
The only support breasts have is the surrounding skin and the Cooper's ligaments, which extend from the nipples to the pectoral muscles.