medicine

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medicine

 [med´ĭ-sin]
1. any drug or remedy.
2. the art and science of the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the maintenance of health.
3. the nonsurgical treatment of disease.
alternative medicine see complementary and alternative medicine.
aviation medicine the branch of medicine that deals with the physiologic, medical, psychologic, and epidemiologic problems involved in flying.
ayurvedic medicine the traditional medicine of India, done according to Hindu scriptures and making use of plants and other healing materials native to India.
behavioral medicine a type of psychosomatic medicine focused on psychological means of influencing physical symptoms, such as biofeedback or relaxation.
clinical medicine
1. the study of disease by direct examination of the living patient.
2. the last two years of the usual curriculum in a medical college.
complementary medicine (complementary and alternative medicine (CAM)) a large and diverse set of systems of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention based on philosophies and techniques other than those used in conventional Western medicine, often derived from traditions of medical practice used in other, non-Western cultures. Such practices may be described as alternative, that is, existing as a body separate from and as a replacement for conventional Western medicine, or complementary, that is, used in addition to conventional Western practice. CAM is characterized by its focus on the whole person as a unique individual, on the energy of the body and its influence on health and disease, on the healing power of nature and the mobilization of the body's own resources to heal itself, and on the treatment of the underlying causes, rather than symptoms, of disease. Many of the techniques used are the subject of controversy and have not been validated by controlled studies.
emergency medicine the medical specialty that deals with the acutely ill or injured who require immediate medical treatment. See also emergency and emergency care.
experimental medicine study of the science of healing diseases based on experimentation in animals.
family medicine family practice.
forensic medicine the application of medical knowledge to questions of law; see also medical jurisprudence. Called also legal medicine.
group medicine the practice of medicine by a group of physicians, usually representing various specialties, who are associated together for the cooperative diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.
internal medicine the medical specialty that deals with diagnosis and medical treatment of diseases and disorders of internal structures of the body.
legal medicine forensic medicine.
nuclear medicine the branch of medicine concerned with the use of radionuclides in diagnosis and treatment of disease.
patent medicine a drug or remedy protected by a trademark, available without a prescription.
physical medicine physiatry.
preclinical medicine the subjects studied in medicine before the student observes actual diseases in patients.
preventive medicine the branch of medical study and practice aimed at preventing disease and promoting health.
proprietary medicine any chemical, drug, or similar preparation used in the treatment of diseases, if such article is protected against free competition as to name, product, composition, or process of manufacture by secrecy, patent, trademark, or copyright, or by other means.
psychosomatic medicine the study of the interrelations between bodily processes and emotional life.
socialized medicine a system of medical care regulated and controlled by the government; called also state medicine.
space medicine the branch of aviation medicine concerned with conditions encountered by human beings in space.
sports medicine the field of medicine concerned with injuries sustained in athletic endeavors, including their prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.
state medicine socialized medicine.
travel medicine (travelers' medicine) the subspecialty of tropical medicine consisting of the diagnosis and treatment or prevention of diseases of travelers.
tropical medicine medical science as applied to diseases occurring primarily in the tropics and subtropics.
veterinary medicine the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of animals other than humans.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

med·i·cine

(med'i-sin),
1. A drug.
2. The art of preventing or curing disease; the science concerned with disease in all its relations.
3. The study and treatment of general diseases or those affecting the internal parts of the body, especially those not usually requiring surgical intervention.
[L. medicina, fr. medicus, physician (see medicus)]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

medicine

(mĕd′ĭ-sĭn)
n.
1.
a. The science and art of diagnosing and treating disease or injury and maintaining health.
b. The branch of this science encompassing treatment by drugs, diet, exercise, and other nonsurgical means.
2. The practice of medicine.
3. A substance, especially a drug, used to treat the signs and symptoms of a disease, condition, or injury.
4.
a. Shamanistic practices or beliefs, especially among Native Americans.
b. Something, such as a ritual practice or sacred object, believed to control natural or supernatural powers or serve as a preventive or remedy.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

medicine

Medspeak
(1) The art and science of maintaining health; recognising, understanding, preventing, diagnosing, alleviating, managing and treating diseases, injuries, disorders and deformities in all their relations that affect the human body in general, including surgery.
(2) A popular term for internal medicine.

Therapeutics
A drug or therapeutic agent.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

medicine

Medtalk A discipline devoted to understanding and treating disease, often referring to physical and chemical mechanisms. Related terms are Addiction medicine, Aerospace medicine, Behavioral medicine, Botanical medicine, Boutique medicine, Cardiovascular medicine, Chinese herbal medicine, Community medicine, Complementary medicine, Cookbook medicine, Correctional medicine, Critical care medicine, Defensive medicine, Electromedicine, Emergency medicine, Energy medicine, Environmental medicine, Ethnic traditional Chinese medicine, Evidence-based medicine, Evolutionary medicine, Field medicine, Folk medicine, Fringe medicine, Gender-specific medicine, Global medicine, Herbal medicine, Humanistic medicine, Integrative medicine, Japanese medicine, Legal medicine, Low yield medicine, Mail-order medicine, Mainstream medicine, Mickey Mouse medicine, Military medicine, Mind/body medicine, Molecular medicine, Mountain medicine, Nuclear medicine, Occupational medicine, Organized medicine, Orthomolecular medicine, Palliative medicine, Patient-oriented medicine, Pain medicine, Performing arts medicine, Preclinical medicine, Preventive medicine, Psychosomatic medicine, Rehabilitation medicine, Schüssler's biochemical system of medicine, Social medicine, Socialized medicine, Space medicine, Sports medicine, Telemedicine, Traditional medicine, Traditional Chinese medicine, Transfusion medicine, Translational medicine, Travel medicine, Tropical medicine, Vibrational medicine, Wilderness medicine Therapeutics A drug or therapeutic agent See Black medicine, Natural medicine, Outdated medicine, Patent medicine, Pink medicine.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

med·i·cine

(med'i-sin)
1. A drug.
2. The art of preventing, diagnosing, and treating disease; the science concerned with disease in all its aspects.
3. The study and treatment of general diseases or those affecting the internal parts of the body, especially those not usually requiring surgical intervention.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

medicine

1. The branch of science devoted to the prevention of disease (hygiene), the restoration of the sick to health (therapy) and the safe management of childbirth (obstetrics). Medicine is a scientific discipline but the practice of medicine involves social skills and the exercise of sympathy, understanding and identification, not normally demanded of a scientist.
2. Medical practice not involving surgical operative intervention. In this sense, medicine and surgery are distinguished.
3. Any drug given for therapeutic purposes.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

med·i·cine

(med'i-sin)
1. A drug.
2. Art of preventing or curing disease.
3. Study and treatment of general diseases or those affecting the internal parts of the body.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about medicine

Q. How effective are the traditional medicines?

A. I agree, chinese medicine is more about preventing- having the person totaly healthy at all times and not only curing the disease.

Q. Is there any Chinese medicine for cancer. Hi every one! I am a student of famous University. I heard about Chinese Medicine but I don’t have any idea. One of the incurable diseases is cancer. Is there any Chinese medicine for cancer?

A. hows it going DOC;I have seen and worked on patiants with lung cancer that had tried alternative meds(chines)and other natural remedies,and tried to cure them selves at home. when these patient come into the hospital they are almost in respiratory failure,because of the time they took with these unproven meds/IF alternative meds work for some people i am happy, but there needs to be more info on it for the general public, as you know all meds dont work for all people,the people that have been cured by chin meds should be monitered by both types of DR. during the treatment so that it can be proven.I will keep an open mind until this happens--peace--mrfoot56

Q. What are the most common Chinese Medicines that are most common in use?

A. i think that acupuncture is the most common of all the chines treatments in use. but i have no statistics to back it up. but as i understand - it's one of the most important tools of the Chinese medicine.

More discussions about medicine
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, there are positive examples of integration, like the integrated use of Ayurveda and conventional medicine in treating elephantiasis in India, that resulted in a lifetime achievement award from the International Society of Dermatologists for Oxford professor of Dermatology Terence Ryan; the highly successful integrated treatment of depression with Yoga medicine and conventional medicine in the National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience in Bangalore (Bengaluru) in India; and the widely adopted use of Yoga medicine for geriatrics in Japan.
Almost all (90,4%) believe that CAM can be integrated into conventional medicine in the future; 91,6% wants CAM materials to be taught in medical faculties, either as an elective (76,8%) or compulsory (14,8%).
Perception and feedback of good or bad effects by the patients should be conveyed to concerned authorities by health-care practitioners in order to make the best use of CAM in addition to conventional medicine.
On the other hand, the negative association between CAM and conventional medicine utilization suggests that individuals are opting for CAM prior to or instead of using conventional medicine (Agdal 2005).
Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) covers a wide range of over 100 healing approaches, philosophies and therapeutic modalities that are not provided by conventional medicine.1 CAM was classified according to the National Center of Complementary and Alternative Medicine into five main domains: mind - body therapies, biologically - based therapies, manipulative and body - based methods, energy therapies and whole medical systems.2 In Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia, the most commonly used CAM practices are reciting Quran, honey, bee products, herbal medicine, hijama and cauterization.3
Conventional medicine may win immediate healthcare battles but often with considerable, long-term collateral damage.
In the survey, the most frequently cited reasons for using CAM are for general wellness (77%), to help reduce pain or treat a painful condition (73%), to treat a specific health condition (59%) and to supplement conventional medicine (53%).
The authors, from the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, said: "Many of the adverse events associated with failure to use conventional medicine resulted from the family's belief in complementary and alternative medicine and determination to use it despite medical advice."
In this first volume of a planned Why We're Sick series, Case focuses primarily on the shortcomings of conventional medicine. He points to several conflicts of interest between "Big Pharma" and the US Food and Drug Administration, and relates how pharmaceutical companies court doctors with everything from free samples to free seminars in exotic locations.
Yet 44%-76% of cancer survivors report seeking treatments outside of conventional medicine (Fouladbakhsh, 2010).
However, my experience is that people have so little knowledge of their own bodies and of what conventional medicine is all about that they will all too happily accept the word of quacks and charlatans, particularly if they are persuasive, as many of our alternative and complementary colleagues are.
One possible reason is that conventional medicine, with its emphasis on drugs and surgery, has an intensely biological focus.

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