CITES

(redirected from Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species)
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Related to Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species: Convention on Biological Diversity

CITES

Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. An arrangement between nations to restrict the commercial traffic in rare species of animals and plants e.g. rhinoceros horn, rare birds, ivory and orchids.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) aims to ensure that international trade in listed species of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival in the wild.
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna bans international trade in fin whales and other whales.
In 2002, 32 species of seahorses were entered under Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), signed by 166 nations.
And in 1975, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, or CITES, prohibited the commercial trade of vicuna products, from hides to wool.
This new piece of legislation amends Council Regulation 338/97/EC which contains lists of animal and plant species for which trade is restricted or controlled, lists that contain the annexes to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES Convention).
without the permits required by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) in a 10-month period from 2001-2002.
Backed by the 27-member European Union on Wednesday, the proposal would ban trade in bluefin tuna from the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea under Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.
Activists charge that Ringling has supported a loosening of the ban on elephant ivory sales at meetings of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).
In January 1990, African elephants joined the ranks of the officially endangered, as defined by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, a treaty organization that seeks to regulate trade in rare plants and animals.
Emirates Wildlife Society - WWF and the Environment Agency - Abu Dhabi have been putting the leaflets together over the last three years as part of a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) project.
CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (or Washington Convention), protects more than 30,000 species of animals and plants from commercial over-exploitation and ensures that trade remains sustainable.
The African countries of Zimbabwe, Botswana and Namibia, permitted in 1997 to sell existing ivory stocks to Japan, withdrew their proposals for further trade at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) this past April.

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