convection

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current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Albatross, Drake "engaged in making deep sea explorations and observed that in the great fog generating belt of the Behring Sea, in the Japan and gulf streams, as well as in the polar currents, the fog is suspended in barely perceptible air currents near the surface of the water and does not reach to the higher altitudes at all." In his fog-dissipating machine, an acetylene gas and air mixture is ignited and the resulting explosion produces an upwardly moving column of hot air resulting in convection currents which lift the fog.
Based on his objection, Planck recognized that the Sun supported convection currents. Carrington's differential solar rotation had been well known for over fifty years [18] and the convective nature of granular field was also firmly established [23].
The air becomes very humid and unstable, and this sets up strong convection currents.
TAKHAR, Radiation effects on free convection currents flow past semi-infinite vertical plate, Modelling, Measurement and control, B51 (1993), 31-40.
"Think about convection currents off the side of hills," suggested Anthony.
He was the first to propose that slow-moving convection currents in the Earth's mantle caused continental break up, seafloor formation, crustal assimilation and continental drifting.
Cooling is also a problem, despite the extreme cold of the vacuum of space, because there are no convection currents to move heat away from the router.
The environment surrounding the drying coating experiences fluctuations in temperature and in the rate of cooling caused by fluctuations in convection currents in the surrounding air.
The ground heats up, producing convection currents, sucking every drop of moisture from the land and whips the air's molecules into a frenzy of activity, kicking up stinking winds and horrid humidity.
Young geologists will be introduced to major concepts in earth science--such as tectonic plates, shear and pressure waves: and convection currents through this creative and clear text.
Physically this can be justified, because in the process of externally cooling of the plate, the free convection currents travel away from the plate.
* The convection currents inside the liquid and at the solid liquid interface are ignored;