convection

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Related to Convection cooling: Thermal convection

current

 [kur´ent]
1. something that flows.
2. specifically, electricity transmitted through a circuit.
alternating current a current that periodically flows in opposite directions; its amplitude fluctuates as a sine wave.
convection current a current caused by movement by convection of warmer fluid into an area of cooler fluid.
direct current a current that flows in one direction only; when modeled as a wave, its amplitude is constant. When used medically it is called galvanic current. This current has distinct and important polarity and marked secondary chemical effects.
galvanic current a steady direct current.
current of injury an electric current that flows between injured myocardium and normal myocardium, because such cells have a reduced membrane potential; it may be either diastolic or systolic.
current of injury, diastolic the current that flows from injured to noninjured tissue during electrical diastole.
current of injury, systolic the current that flows from healthy tissue to injured tissue during electrical systole.
inwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the interior of a cell.
leakage current the electrical current that exists in the parts or metal case of electrical equipment.
outwardly rectifying current current that rectifies so that it passes more easily towards the exterior of a cell.
potassium rectifying c's transmembrane currents that rectify inwardly or outwardly to make adjustments in cellular functions; they are mainly responsible for the repolarization phase of the action potential. There are at least six mechanisms by which potassium ions move across cardiac cell membranes in the role of rectifier.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·vec·tion

(kon-vek'shŭn),
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

con·vec·tion

(kŏn-vek'shŭn)
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ceiling.
[L. con-veho, pp. -vectus, to carry or bring together]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

convection

the propagation of heat through liquids and gases by the movement of the heated particles, increasing their kinetic energy.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Most high-powered electronic devices are cooled by forced convection airflow, but occasionally there is a need for natural convection cooling. Determining factors, which include cost, noise, vibration and reliability, can cause the need to eliminate the use of a fan or blower - particularly in consumer electronics and outdoor enclosures.
The W1-3200 can be used to characterize heat sink sizes for natural and forced convection cooling.Two heat sinks can be tested side by side.
Delivering up to 150 W by convection cooling alone, the units deliver a maximum of 225 W when a forced air flow of only 10 CFM is applied.
This new single output embedded supply accepts a wide input range of 90 V to 264 VAC, features over 90 percent efficiency, and owing to convection cooling it asserted to have one of the smallest heat footprints among the supplies available in the AC/DC market.
For thermal characterization applications, the PTM-1000[TM] is capable of measuring pressure drop across channels in circuit cards and assemblies; differential pressure across Pitot tubes and orifice plates; intake-to-exhaust pressure drop in forced convection cooling systems; and pressure drop across in-line filters.
The ZWS line of compact AC-DC power supplies provides 300-watts with convection cooling (no fans required).
They require only convection cooling and do not require a fan or heat sink while operating from -40[degrees]C to +85[degrees]C.
With a compact 2"x4" footprint, and a height of just 1", the NPS40-M series supports up to 45 W with convection cooling and up to 60 W with forced air cooling.
Specifically designed for medical applications, it is capable of delivering 400 W of continuous output power at 7 CFM forced air or 300 W at convection cooling. The unit is a compact, open frame design measuring only 4 x 7 x 1.58 in.