skeletal muscle

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skel·e·tal mus·cle

grossly, a collection of striated voluntary muscle fibers connected at either or both extremities with the bony framework of the body; may be appendicular or axial; histologically, a muscle consisting of elongated, multinucleated, transversely striated skeletal muscle fibers together with connective tissues, blood vessels, and nerves; individual muscle fibers are surrounded by fine reticular and collagen fibers (endomysium); bundles (fascicles) of muscle fibers are surrounded by irregular connective tissue (perimysium); the entire muscle is surrounded, except at the muscle tendon junction, by a dense connective tissue (epimysium).
Synonym(s): musculus skeleti
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

skeletal muscle

n.
A usually voluntary muscle that is made up of elongated, multinucleate, transversely striated muscle fibers and is typically attached to a bone.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

skel·e·tal mus·cle

(skel'ĕ-tăl mŭs'ĕl)
Grossly, a collection of striated muscle fibers connected at either or both extremities with the bony framework of the body; it may be an appendicular or an axial muscle; histologically, a muscle consisting of elongated, multinucleated, transversely striated skeletal muscle fibers together with connective tissues, blood vessels, and nerves; individual muscle fibers are surrounded by fine reticular and collagen fibers (endomysium); bundles (fascicles) of muscle fibers are surrounded by irregular connective tissue (perimysium); the entire muscle is surrounded, except at the muscle-tendon junction, by a dense connective tissue (epimysium).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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MORPHOLOGICAL FORMS OF MUSCLE
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MORPHOLOGICAL FORMS OF MUSCLE
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MORPHOLOGICAL FORMS OF MUSCLE

skeletal muscle

A tissue composed of muscle cells (often multinucleated) that contain neatly packed actin and myosin filaments; these filaments are arranged in cylindrical bundles called myofibrils. In each cell, the myofibrils are all aligned in the same direction and are parceled into longitudinal blocks (called sarcomeres) of similar lengths. Under the microscope, the ends of the blocks look like lines, making skeletal muscle cells appear to have regularly arranged striations. See: illustration

Skeletal muscle is innervated by somatic (as opposed to autonomic) motor axons at a synaptic structure called a motor endplate, where acetylcholine is the neurotransmitter. Most skeletal muscles can be controlled consciously, and skeletal muscle is sometimes referred to as voluntary muscle. Skeletal muscle cells contract more forcefully than smooth or cardiac muscle cells.

Skeletal muscle got its name because it usually attaches at one end to bone. Skeletal muscle is by far the most common type of muscle in the body and it plays a major role in normal metabolism, e.g., after a meal, excess glucose is removed from the blood stream primarily by skeletal muscle.

See also: muscle
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

skeletal muscle

see STRIATED MUSCLE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Skeletal muscle

Muscle connected to, and necessary for the movement of, bones.
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Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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