contract

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con·tract

(kon-trakt'),
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

contract

/con·tract/ (kon-trakt´)
1. to shorten, or reduce in size, as a muscle.
2. to acquire or incur.

contract

(kən-trăkt′, kŏn′trăkt′)
v.
1. To reduce in size by drawing together; shrink.
2. To become reduced in size by or as if by being drawn together, as the pupil of the eye.
3. To acquire or incur by contagion or infection.

contract

Etymology: L, con + trahere, to draw
1 n, [kon′trakt] , an agreement or a promise that meets certain legal requirements, including competence of both or all parties to make the contract, proper lawful subject matter, mutuality of agreement, mutuality of obligation, and consideration (the exchange of something of value in payment for the obligation undertaken).
2 v, [kəntrakt′] , to make such an agreement or promise. contractual, adj.

contract

A written, dated and signed agreement between two or more parties, which sets out any arrangements on delegation and distribution of tasks and obligations, and, if appropriate, on financial matters. A clinical trial protocol may serve as the basis for a contract.

contract

Managed care A health care policy or plan in which a provider offers certain services delineated in writing, to which the purchaser–Pt agrees by signature. See Guaranteed renewable contract, Provider risk contract, Subscriber contract.

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. To shorten; to become reduced in size; in the case of muscle, either to shorten or to undergo an increase in tension.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. An explicit bilateral commitment by psychotherapist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of the psychotherapy.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]

con·tract

(kon'trakt, kŏn-trakt')
1. Explicit bilateral commitment by dentist and patient to a defined course of action to attain the goal of therapy.
2. To acquire by contagion or infection.
3. To shorten; to become reduced in size.
[L. con-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw together]
References in periodicals archive ?
17] to multivalued mappings and who obtained coupled coincidence point and common coupled fixed point theorems involving hybrid pair of mappings satisfying generalized contractive conditions in complete metric spaces.
Due to the fact that K([beta] + [gamma]) < 1, it follows that T is strictly contractive.
The total contractive energy of a spherical bubble of radius [DELTA][r.
However, its total population, including expatriates, is a more contractive pyramid with the majority of the population between the ages of 20 and 60.
Then we say x and y are projection orthogonal if and only if P : [x, y] [right arrow] [x] and Q : [x, y] [right arrow] [y] are contractive projections (that is [parallel]P[parallel] = 1 = [parallel]Q[parallel]).
In fractal imaging compression and coding based on Generalized Fractal Transforms (GFT), one seeks to approximate a target image or signal by the fixed points of a contractive fractal transform operator.
These sands are more crushable, more contractive, and less stiff than terrigenous silica sands due to their unique particle properties and carbonate content (Catano & Pando, 2010).
Of course, there is no such thing as a "free lunch"--or free contractive care.
Those transformations that are contractive lead to images that can be termed as fractals.
The contractive monetary policy adopted by Fed chairman Paul Volcker in October 1979 led to the highest interest rates since the Fed was created in 1913--short-term rates climbed to more than 20 percent and long-term rates to more than 10 percent.
Export confidence improved slightly for Japan, but was still in contractive territory.
Unlike monoglossias, heteroglossias allow for other alternative voices or opinions and can either be dialogically contractive or dialogically expansive, as shown in Figure 1 (White, 1998, 2001b, 2003; White & Motoki, 2006).