contraceptive

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Related to Contraceptives: Oral contraceptives

contraceptive

 [kon″trah-sep´tiv]
1. diminishing the likelihood of or preventing conception.
2. an agent that does this; see also contraception.
oral contraceptive a compound, usually hormonal, taken orally in order to block ovulation and prevent the occurrence of pregnancy. See also contraception.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

con·tra·cep·tive

(kon'tră-sep'tiv),
1. An agent to prevent conception.
2. Relating to any measure or agent designed to prevent conception.
[L. contra, against, + conceptive]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

contraceptive

(kŏn′trə-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
Relating to or capable of preventing contraception.
n.
A contraceptive drug or device, such as a birth control pill or a condom.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

contraceptive

adjective Relating to contraception.
 
noun Any device or method for preventing fertilisation.
 
Types
Barrier methods (condoms, diaphragms), hormone combinations, spermicides, implantable hormonal devices, RU-486 and others.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

contraceptive

Obstetrics adjective Relating to contraception noun Any device or method for preventing fertilization, or a term product of conception Types Barrier methods–condoms, diaphragms, hormone combinations, spermicides, implantable hormonal devices, RU-486, etc. See Contraception, Dalkon shield, IUD, 'Litogen. ', Lunelle, Mirena, Nuvaring, Oral contraceptive, Ortho Evra, Pearl index, RU-486, Seasonale, Sequential oral contraceptive, Wrongful birth.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

con·tra·cep·tive

(kon'tră-sep'tiv)
1. An agent that prevents conception.
2. Relating to any measure or agent designed to prevent conception.
[L. contra, against, + conceptive]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

contraceptive

see BIRTH CONTROL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Patient discussion about contraceptive

Q. Does it exist a Birth Control Shot for men?

A. No. Currently there are no available medications for birth control for men. However, there are several other methods, including barrier methods (condom) and more irreversible ones (e.g. vasectomy) which may require a treatment by a surgeon.

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001946.htm

Q. BIRTH CONTROL how many types are there?

A. HI doctor-you forgot one--THE CELL PHONE RADIATION,next time you go out on a date dont forget your cell phone and a piece of string.HA HA ---mrfoot56

Q. how long after i have stop taking birth control pills can i get pregnant?

A. After you stop taking the pill, you may have only a two-week delay before you ovulate again. Once ovulation resumes, you can become pregnant. If this happens during your first cycle off the pill, you may not have a period at all. However, although possible, this scenario isn't likely.

More discussions about contraceptive
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References in periodicals archive ?
Glycaemic status is not a contraindication for any type of hormonal contraceptive. However, associated factors such as duration of disease, presence of micro and macrovascular complications, as well as severity of hypertension may influence choice of hormonal contraceptives.
In 2016, with a market share of over 57%, the Americas emerged as the market leader in the global contraceptive sponges market, followed by EMEA with over 23% and APAC with over 19%.
-North America is the major shareholder, accounting for about 32% share of the world contraceptives market.
The risks were higher for adolescents aged 15-19, the team found; use of combined oral contraceptives or progestin-only pills among this age group was associated with a 1.8 and 2.2 times greater relative risk of first-time antidepressant use, respectively, and those who used non-oral hormonal contraceptives were at three times greater risk.
Because current data regarding contraceptive use prevalence in Puerto Rico are not available, the number of women in Puerto Rico who desire effective contraception was estimated using several data sources.
The data showed that women who used hormonal contraception reported having an increased number of seizures while on the contraceptive about 4.5-fold more often than did women who used nonhormonal contraception.
Results of the multivariate analysis showed that respondents in the age groups of 15-19 years and 35-44 years were more likely not using contraceptives. Furthermore, there exist significant differentials in contraceptive use between provinces showing that, as compare to Balochistan, the contraceptive use was high in Punjab, KPK and Sindh.
Educating marginalised counties would also increase contraceptive use.
Supporters of contraceptive use condescendingly accuse couples who shun contraceptives that they multiply like rabbits.
For example, opponents of the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) contraceptive coverage guarantee have argued that the policy is unnecessary because condoms are inexpensive and readily available at drug stores.
Women in Kinshasa present similarly low rates of awareness and use of emergency contraceptives. In 2015, only 23% of women aged 15-49 reported having heard of the method, and just 2% and 4% of married and unmarried sexually active women, respectively, reported using emergency contraceptive pills as their primary contraceptive method.