plate tectonics

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plate tectonics

the study of the movement of the large crustal plates that form the surface of the earth on the continental land masses and beneath the seas. see CONTINENTAL DRIFT.
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Continental plate Laurentia was crashing into oceanic plate Iapetus.
About half of the world's subduction zones, which typically lie in deep water far offshore, are considered erosive margins, where the ocean-crust plate is scouring the front edge of the overriding continental plate, says Francesca Remitti, a geologist at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia in Italy.
In the fourth type, called collision, two continental plates crash into each other, forming high mountains.
This book/CD-ROM package covers the tectonics and plate dynamics of the Pacific-Australian continental plate boundary in South Island, and details the application of modern geological and geophysical methods.
The zone is a fault line where two giant tectonic plates - the Juan de Fuca and North American, or continental plate - are locked tightly against each other.
It may look all right with the small features of a continental plate but with Britain's bold registration characters, it sticks out like a sore thumb on the nearside valance.
This belt of volcanics and intrusives possibly contains remnants of an island arc system that was accreted onto the Australian continental plate during the Oligocene.
The granitic-pegmatites are also exposed in the Indo-Pakistan continental plate in the Nanga Parbat-Haramosh Massif at Dache, Khaltaro, Shegus and Stak Nala.
The quakes originated from the Cascadia Subduction Zone, 30 miles southwest of Newport, the meeting point of two large tectonic plates known as the San Juan de Fuca plate and the continental plate.
There, two large slabs of the Earth's crust called the Juan de Fuca and the Gorda plates have been diving ponderously down beneath the North American continental plate for millions of years.
Using GPS measurements from other locations and conventional surveying methods, researchers have estimated that Everest Is rising an average of 1 to 2 inches per year, pushed up by the collision of India's continental plate with Asia's.
DSDP investigations demonstrated that oceanic plate sediments progressively adhere to the leading edge of the overriding continental plate, forming an "accretionary prism.